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dc.contributor.authorDe, Oindrila
dc.contributor.authorRice, Clinton
dc.contributor.authorZulueta-Coarasa, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorFernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.authorWard, Robert E., IV
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-14T19:02:39Z
dc.date.available2023-02-14T19:02:39Z
dc.date.issued2022-09-27
dc.identifier.citationDe O, Rice C, Zulueta-Coarasa T, Fernandez-Gonzalez R and Ward RE (2022) Septate junction proteins are required for cell shape changes, actomyosin reorganization and cell adhesion during dorsal closure in Drosophila. Front. Cell Dev. Biol. 10:947444. doi: 10.3389/fcell.2022.947444en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/33794
dc.description.abstractSeptate junctions (SJs) serve as occluding barriers in invertebrate epithelia. In Drosophila, at least 30 genes are required for the formation or maintenance of SJs. Interestingly, loss-of-function mutations in core SJ components are embryonic lethal, with defects in developmental events such as head involution and dorsal closure (DC) that occur prior to the formation of a mature SJ, indicating a role for these proteins in mid-embryogenesis independent of their occluding function. To understand this novel function in development, we examined loss-of-function mutations in three core SJ proteins during the process of DC. DC occurs during mid-embryogenesis to seal a dorsal gap in the epidermis following germ band retraction. Closure is driven by contraction of the extraembryonic amnioserosa cells that temporarily cover the dorsal surface and by cell shape changes (elongation) of lateral epidermal cells that bring the contralateral sheets together at the dorsal midline. Using live imaging and examination of fixed tissues, we show that early events in DC occur normally in SJ mutant embryos, but during later closure, coracle, Macroglobulin complement-related and Neurexin-IV mutant embryos exhibit slower rates of closure and display aberrant cells shapes in the dorsolateral epidermis, including dorsoventral length and apical surface area. SJ mutant embryos also show mild defects in actomyosin structures along the leading edge, but laser cutting experiments suggest similar tension and viscoelastic properties in SJ mutant versus wild type epidermis. In a high percentage of SJ mutant embryos, the epidermis tears free from the amnioserosa near the end of DC and live imaging and immunostaining reveal reduced levels of E-cadherin, suggesting that defective adhesion may be responsible for these tears. Supporting this notion, reducing E-cadherin by half significantly enhances the penetrance of DC defects in coracle mutant embryos.en_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.rights© 2022 De, Rice, Zulueta-Coarasa, Fernandez-Gonzalez and Ward. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectSeptate junctionen_US
dc.subjectDorsal closureen_US
dc.subjectAdhesionen_US
dc.subjectCell shape changeen_US
dc.subjectActomyosinen_US
dc.titleSeptate junction proteins are required for cell shape changes, actomyosin reorganization and cell adhesion during dorsal closure in Drosophilaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorRice, Clinton
kusw.kudepartmentMolecular Biosciencesen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fcell.2022.947444en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmidPMC9553006en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© 2022 De, Rice, Zulueta-Coarasa, Fernandez-Gonzalez and Ward. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2022 De, Rice, Zulueta-Coarasa, Fernandez-Gonzalez and Ward. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).