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dc.contributor.authorPerlmutter, Jessamyn I.
dc.contributor.authorBordenstein, Sarah R.
dc.contributor.authorUnckless, Robert L.
dc.contributor.authorLePage, Daniel P.
dc.contributor.authorMetcalf, Jason A.
dc.contributor.authorHill, Tom
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Julien
dc.contributor.authorJiggins, Francis M.
dc.contributor.authorBordenstein, Seth R.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-23T23:02:40Z
dc.date.available2021-02-23T23:02:40Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-10
dc.identifier.citationPerlmutter JI, Bordenstein SR, Unckless RL, LePage DP, Metcalf JA, Hill T, et al. (2019) The phage gene wmk is a candidate for male killing by a bacterial endosymbiont. PLoS Pathog 15(9): e1007936. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1007936en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/31467
dc.description.abstractWolbachia are the most widespread maternally-transmitted bacteria in the animal kingdom. Their global spread in arthropods and varied impacts on animal physiology, evolution, and vector control are in part due to parasitic drive systems that enhance the fitness of infected females, the transmitting sex of Wolbachia. Male killing is one common drive mechanism wherein the sons of infected females are selectively killed. Despite decades of research, the gene(s) underlying Wolbachia-induced male killing remain unknown. Here using comparative genomic, transgenic, and cytological approaches in fruit flies, we identify a candidate gene in the eukaryotic association module of Wolbachia prophage WO, termed WO-mediated killing (wmk), which transgenically causes male-specific lethality during early embryogenesis and cytological defects typical of the pathology of male killing. The discovery of wmk establishes new hypotheses for the potential role of phage genes in sex-specific lethality, including the control of arthropod pests and vectors.en_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.rights© 2019 Perlmutter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.titleThe phage gene wmk is a candidate for male killing by a bacterial endosymbionten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorUnckless, Robert L.
kusw.kudepartmentMolecular Biosciencesen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1007936en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-9789-4674en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-6092-1950en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8586-7137en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-4661-6391en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8210-2921en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7470-8157en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7346-0954en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© 2019 Perlmutter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2019 Perlmutter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.