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dc.contributor.advisorBarnett, William A.
dc.contributor.authorDiallo, Ibrahima
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-30T20:04:12Z
dc.date.available2013-09-30T20:04:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-31
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:12731
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/12327
dc.description.abstractEconomists inflate the explanatory power of measurable variables such as price and income to explain demand. Using only quantifiable variables is very attractive since it makes it easy to construct mathematically consistent and well expressed models. However, since Lancaster (1971), economic awareness has increased to such a degree that latent, hardly observable and/or measurable variables may bring more insight to the demand analysis. Two approaches compete to introduce such variables: an economic approach originally developed by Lancaster and Becker (1965), and a statistical approach. For Lancaster, beyond quantities of goods demanded, the characteristics of goods are what shape consumer utility and consequently determine its choice. This approach is theoretical and largely based on economic intuition. Few empirical studies using Lancaster have been successful so far. The second, purely statistical approach, considers the possibility of transforming observed data to obtain the "basic wants" that truly affect consumer choice. This approach, known as the Preference Independence Transformation (PIT), has so far been applied only in a few studies using the Rotterdam model frame. The PIT was certainly deduced through mathematically thorough and consistent analysis to uncover the basic want, denoted as T-goods. We intend to revisit the PIT under the Rotterdam framework to uncover the basic goods. Alongside, we implement --for the first time--an independent transformation that eliminates the Slusky interdependencies from the Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) setting. We will refer to it as the Slutsky Matrix Independent Transformation (SMIT). Regarding our purpose to check if the two techniques identically define the basic goods, the findings were not conclusive. As a result, we further the analysis by introducing a possibility to unveil the basic wants using US household data.
dc.format.extent157 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectEconomics
dc.subjectMarketing
dc.subjectBasic want
dc.subjectCharacteristic
dc.subjectConsumption
dc.subjectHousehold
dc.subjectPreference independence transformation
dc.subjectSlutsky
dc.titleUNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberBhattacharyya, Gautam
dc.contributor.cmtememberComolli, Paul
dc.contributor.cmtememberShenoy, Prakash P.
dc.contributor.cmtememberZhang, Jianbo
dc.contributor.cmtememberBarnett, William A.
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineEconomics
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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