Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMunson, Eric J.
dc.contributor.authorSchieber, Loren J.
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-09T02:47:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-09T02:47:01Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-22
dc.date.submitted2010
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:10723
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/6279
dc.description.abstractSolid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique for investigating solid dosage formulations. SSNMR has the ability to determine physical form, molecular structure, and dynamics of a pure or formulated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). To overcome the major shortcomings of SSNMR, acquisition time and sensitivity, a two-sample probe was designed, developed, and tested. The probe allowed for two samples to be acquired simultaneously while being shuttled through the magnet bore with a stepper motor, and exhibited signal to noise ratio (SNR) values comparable to current probes. Pharmaceutical relevance was demonstrated by acquiring spectra of ibuprofen and aspirin simultaneously. 19F SSNMR was used to examine low-level amorphous impurities in crystalline physical mixtures. The model compound was chosen for amorphous form stability, cost, and 19F SSNMR spectral resolution between the crystalline and amorphous solid forms. Triamcinolone was selected for quantitation studies using 19F SSNMR.
dc.format.extent241 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectPharmaceutical chemistry
dc.subjectAmorphous
dc.subjectFluorine
dc.subjectNmr
dc.subjectOxygen
dc.subjectRelaxation
dc.subjectSolid-state
dc.titleMethods for Increasing Sensitivity and Throughput of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Pharmaceutical Solids
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberBerkland, Cory J.
dc.contributor.cmtememberGehrke, Stevin H.
dc.contributor.cmtememberLunte, Susan M.
dc.contributor.cmtememberStobaugh, John F.
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePharmaceutical Chemistry
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record