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dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Larry D.
dc.contributor.advisorHasiotis, Stephen T.
dc.contributor.authorFalk, Amanda Renee
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-18T04:04:08Z
dc.date.available2010-03-18T04:04:08Z
dc.date.issued2009-09-17
dc.date.submitted2009
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:10582
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/5955
dc.description.abstractBird tracks were studied from the Lower Cretaceous Lakota Formation in South Dakota, USA, and the Lower Cretaceous Haman Formation, South Korea. Behaviors documented from the Lakota Formation included: (1) a takeoff behavior represented by a trackway terminating in two subparallel tracks; (2) circular walking; and (3) the courtship display high stepping. Behaviors documented from the Haman Formation included: (1) a low-angle landing in which the hallux toe was dragged; (2) pecking and probing behaviors; and (3) flapping-assisted hopping during walking. The invertebrate trace fossil Cochlichnus was associated the avian tracks from the Lakota Formation. No traces of pecking or probing were associated with Cochlichnus. The invertebrate trace fossils Cochlichnus, Arenicholites, and Steinichnus were found associated the bird tracks from the Haman Formation. Probe and peck marks associated with the avian tracks and trackways from this Formation may indicate interactions between the birds and the invertebrates that produced the traces. The distal end of the avian tarsometatarsus affects the angle of divarication of the toes and, therefore, how tracks and trackways will be produced. The greater the arc angle of the trochlea of the tarsometatarsus, the smaller the angle of divarication between the toes. This correlation is true only for anisodactyl birds as the zygodactyl foot structure has a much greater angle of divarication and, therefore, a more complex arrangement of trochlea. The relationship between the angle of divarication and the arc angle of the trochlea can be used to retrodict the tarsometatarsal morphology and avian morphotype of the fossil tracks and trackways. There is no correlation between stride length and limb length or digit three length in birds; however, weak correlations exist between functional leg length and posture. Weak correlations also exist between avian functional leg length (divided by stride length) as compared to arboreality, method of locomotion, and method of feeding.
dc.format.extent151 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectPaleontology
dc.subjectAngle of divarication
dc.subjectAvian evolution
dc.subjectAvian hindlimb
dc.subjectBird tracks
dc.subjectTarsometatarsus
dc.titleINTERPRETING BEHAVIOR FROM EARLY CRETACEOUS BIRD TRACKS AND THE MORPHOLOGY OF BIRD FEET AND TRACKWAYS
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberDevlin, John F.
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineGeology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.S.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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