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dc.contributor.advisorBranscombe, Nyla R.
dc.contributor.authorReysen, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-13T04:21:00Z
dc.date.available2009-10-13T04:21:00Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-19
dc.date.submitted2009
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:10390
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/5526
dc.description.abstractIn two experiments (N = 162; N = 192) participants' reactions to identity theft are examined. Identity theft is defined as a situation in which a person intentionally appropriates distinctive characteristics of another person's identity. Identity theft represents a moral violation against an individual's claim to display a public identity. Participants reported greater negative reactions when imagining another person appropriating many, but not one, self-characteristics. Moral appraisals of the theft (i.e., illegitimacy, intention to harm) mediated the relationship between the increase in number of self-characteristics copied and anger expressed by participants (Experiment 1). When the thief acknowledged the theft, anger was attenuated. The perception that the harm was not intentional and the perceived honesty of the copier mediated the relationship between the thief acknowledging the theft and participants' anger (Experiment 2). The implications of the present findings for past identity theft research and impression management is discussed.
dc.format.extent105 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectSocial psychology
dc.subjectAnger
dc.subjectEmotion
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.subjectImitation
dc.subjectImpression
dc.subjectMoral
dc.titleIdentity Theft: Moral Antecedents, Moral Anger, and Impression Management
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberCrandall, Christian S.
dc.contributor.cmtememberLandau, Mark
dc.contributor.cmtememberMolina, Ludwin
dc.contributor.cmtememberLee, Tien-Tsung
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePsychology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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