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dc.contributor.authorMoukarzel, Sara
dc.contributor.authorOzias, Marlies
dc.contributor.authorKerling, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorChristifano, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorWick, Jo
dc.contributor.authorColombo, John
dc.contributor.authorCarlson, Susan
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-08T17:44:18Z
dc.date.available2019-11-08T17:44:18Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-23
dc.identifier.citationMoukarzel, S.; Ozias, M.; Kerling, E.; Christifano, D.; Wick, J.; Colombo, J.; Carlson, S. Maternal Vitamin D Status and Infant Infection. Nutrients 2018, 10, 111.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/29745
dc.description.abstractMaternal vitamin D status during pregnancy may modulate fetal immune system development and infant susceptibility to infections. Vitamin D deficiency is common during pregnancy, particularly among African American (AA) women. Our objective was to compare maternal vitamin D status (plasma 25(OH)D concentration) during pregnancy and first-year infections in the offspring of African American (AA) and non-AA women. We used medical records to record frequency and type of infections during the first year of life of 220 term infants (69 AA, 151 non-AA) whose mothers participated in the Kansas University DHA Outcomes Study. AA and non-AA groups were compared for maternal 25(OH)D by Mann–Whitney U-test. Compared to non-AA women, AA women were more likely to be vitamin D deficient (<50 nmol/L; 84 vs. 37%, p < 0.001), and more of their infants had at least one infection in the first 6 months (78.3% and 59.6% of infants, respectively, p = 0.022). We next explored the relationship between maternal plasma 25(OH)D concentration and infant infections using Spearman correlations. Maternal 25(OH)D concentration was inversely correlated with the number of all infections (p = 0.033), eye, ear, nose, and throat (EENT) infections (p = 0.043), and skin infection (p = 0.021) in the first 6 months. A model that included maternal education, income, and 25(OH)D identified maternal education as the only significant predictor of infection risk in the first 6 months (p = 0.045); however, maternal education, income, and 25(OH)D were all significantly lower in AA women compared to non-AA women . The high degree of correlation between these variables does not allow determination of which factor is driving the risk of infection; however, the one that is most easily remediated is vitamin D status. It would be of value to learn if vitamin D supplementation in this at-risk group could ameliorate at least part of the increased infection risken_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development (R01 HD047315 [to SC])en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipthe Kansas Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (P30 HD002528 [to SC and JC])en_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.rights© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licenseen_US
dc.rights.uri(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.subjectinfectionen_US
dc.subject25-hydroxycholecalciferolen_US
dc.subjectvitamin Den_US
dc.subjectPregnancyen_US
dc.subjectinfancyen_US
dc.subjectmaternal nutritionen_US
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen_US
dc.titleMaternal Vitamin D Status and Infant Infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorKerling, Elizabeth
kusw.kuauthorChristifano, Danielle
kusw.kuauthorWick, Jo
kusw.kuauthorColombo, John
kusw.kuauthorCarlson, Susan
kusw.kudepartmentDieteticsen_US
kusw.kudepartmentPsychologyen_US
kusw.kudepartmentbiostatisticsen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu10020111en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, author accepted manuscripten_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access
article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution
(CC BY) license
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license