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dc.contributor.authorCushing, Christopher C.
dc.contributor.authorFedele, David A.
dc.contributor.authorBrannon, Erin E.
dc.contributor.authorKichline, Tiffany
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-30T16:25:19Z
dc.date.available2019-08-30T16:25:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-21
dc.identifier.citationCushing CC, Fedele DA, Brannon EE, Kichline T Parents’ Perspectives on the Theoretical Domains Framework Elements Needed in a Pediatric Health Behavior App: A Crowdsourced Social Validity Study JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2018;6(12):e192 URL: https://mhealth.jmir.org/2018/12/e192/ doi: 10.2196/mhealth.9808 PMID: 30578173en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/29457
dc.descriptionA grant from the One-University Open Access Fund at the University of Kansas was used to defray the author's publication fees in this Open Access journal. The Open Access Fund, administered by librarians from the KU, KU Law, and KUMC libraries, is made possible by contributions from the offices of KU Provost, KU Vice Chancellor for Research & Graduate Studies, and KUMC Vice Chancellor for Research. For more information about the Open Access Fund, please see http://library.kumc.edu/authors-fund.xml.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Most pediatric studies do not include parent stakeholders in the design of the intervention itself and many pediatric mobile health (mHealth) interventions are not meaningfully disseminated after the trial period ends. Consequently, the consumer desire for mobile apps targeting pediatric health behavior is likely to be met by commercial products that are not based in theory or evidence and may not take stakeholder preferences into account. Objective: The aim was to assess parent preference for mobile app features that map onto specific Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) elements. Methods: This study was a crowdsourced social validity study of 183 parents who were asked to rate their preferences for mobile app features that correspond to elements of the TDF. The TDF organizes a large number of theoretical models and constructs into three components: (1) capability, (2) motivation, and (3) opportunity. Parents of children were recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Results: The majority of participants were Caucasian and mean age was 36.9 (SD 8.0) years. Results revealed broad acceptability of communication, motivation, and opportunity domains. However, the degree to which each domain was valued varied within behavioral category. Parents demonstrated a preference for increasing procedural knowledge for physical activity and diet behaviors over sleep (F2,545=5.18, P=.006). Similarly, parents valued self-monitoring as more important for physical activity than sleep (F2,546=4.04, P=.02). When asked about the value of features to help children develop skills, parents preferred those features for dietary behavior over sleep (F2,546=3.57, P=.03). Parents perceived that goal-setting features would be most useful for physical activity over sleep and diet (F2,545=5.30, P=.005). Incentive features within the app were seen as most useful for physical activity over sleep (F2,546=4.34, P=.01). Conclusions: This study presents a low-cost strategy for involving a large number of stakeholders in the discussion of how health behavior theory should be applied in a mHealth intervention. Our approach is innovative in that it took a scientific framework (ie, TDF) and made it digestible to parents so that they could then provide their opinions about features that might appear in a future app. Our survey items discriminated between various health behaviors allowing stakeholders to communicate the different health behaviors that they would like a TDF feature to change. Moreover, we were able to develop a set of consumer opinions about features that were directly linked to elements of the TDF.en_US
dc.publisherJMIR Publicationsen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR mhealth and uhealth, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mhealth.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectmHealthen_US
dc.subjectadolescenten_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectparenten_US
dc.subjectstakeholderen_US
dc.subjectConsumer preferenceen_US
dc.titleParents’ Perspectives on the Theoretical Domains Framework Elements Needed in a Pediatric Health Behavior App: A Crowdsourced Social Validity Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorCushing, Christopher C
kusw.kudepartmentClinical Child Psychology Program and Life Span Instituteen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/mhealth.9808en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8452-8096en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-0896-910Xen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-1579-4881en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1200-3455en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid30578173en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR mhealth and uhealth, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mhealth.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR mhealth and uhealth, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mhealth.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.