Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNariya, Maulik K.
dc.contributor.authorIsraeli, Johnny
dc.contributor.authorShi, Jack J.
dc.contributor.authorDeeds, Eric J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-10T23:46:04Z
dc.date.available2017-09-10T23:46:04Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.citationNariya, M. K., Israeli, J., Shi, J. J., & Deeds, E. J. (2016). Mathematical Model for Length Control by the Timing of Substrate Switching in the Type III Secretion System. PLoS Computational Biology, 12(4), e1004851. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004851en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/24936
dc.descriptionA grant from the One-University Open Access Fund at the University of Kansas was used to defray the author's publication fees in this Open Access journal. The Open Access Fund, administered by librarians from the KU, KU Law, and KUMC libraries, is made possible by contributions from the offices of KU Provost, KU Vice Chancellor for Research & Graduate Studies, and KUMC Vice Chancellor for Research. For more information about the Open Access Fund, please see http://library.kumc.edu/authors-fund.xml.en_US
dc.description.abstractType III Secretion Systems (T3SS) are complex bacterial structures that provide gram-negative pathogens with a unique virulence mechanism whereby they grow a needle-like structure in order to inject bacterial effector proteins into the cytoplasm of a host cell. Numerous experiments have been performed to understand the structural details of this nanomachine during the past decade. Despite the concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, several crucial aspects of the assembly of this structure, such as the regulation of the length of the needle itself, remain unclear. In this work, we used a combination of mathematical and computational techniques to better understand length control based on the timing of substrate switching, which is a possible mechanism for how bacteria ensure that the T3SS needles are neither too short nor too long. In particular, we predicted the form of the needle length distribution based on this mechanism, and found excellent agreement with available experimental data from Salmonella typhimurium with only a single free parameter. Although our findings provide preliminary evidence in support of the substrate switching model, they also make a set of quantitative predictions that, if tested experimentally, would assist in efforts to unambiguously characterize the regulatory mechanisms that control the growth of this crucial virulence factor.en_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.rights© 2016 Nariya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.titleMathematical Model for Length Control by the Timing of Substrate Switching in the Type III Secretion Systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorNariya, Maulik K.
kusw.kuauthorIsraeli, Johnny
kusw.kuauthorShi, Jack J.
kusw.kuauthorDeeds, Eric J.
kusw.kudepartmentPhysics and Astronomyen_US
kusw.kudepartmentCenter for Computational Biologyen_US
kusw.kudepartmentMolecular Biosciencesen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004851en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1633-5780
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid4831731en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2016 Nariya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2016 Nariya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.