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dc.contributor.authorSchroeder, Stephen R.
dc.contributor.authorMarquis, Janet
dc.contributor.authorReese, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorRichman, David
dc.contributor.authorMayo-Ortega, Liliana
dc.contributor.authorOyama-Ganiko, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorLeBlanc, Judith
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Nancy C.
dc.contributor.authorButler, Merlin G.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Tiffany
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Linda
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-09T15:52:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-09T15:52:42Z
dc.date.issued2014-07
dc.identifier.citationSchroeder, S. R., Marquis, J. G., Reese, R. M., Richman, D. M., Mayo-Ortega, L., Oyama-Ganiko, R., … Lawrence, L. (2014). Risk Factors for Self-Injury, Aggression, and Stereotyped Behavior Among Young Children At Risk for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 119(4), 351–370. http://doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-119.4.351en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/24036
dc.description.abstractBefore the 1990s, research on the early identification and prevention of severe behavior disorders (SBDs), such as aggression, self-injury, and stereotyped behavior, among young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), was mostly done with children 3 years or older. More recent work suggests that signs of SBDs may occur as early as 6 months in some infants. The present study combined a cross-sectional and longitudinal approach to examine SBDs in 180 young children aged 4–48 months recruited through mass screening, then receiving an interdisciplinary evaluation and six-month follow-ups for one year. Twelve potential risk factors related to SBDs were examined. Eight of these risk factors, including age, gender, diagnosis, intellectual and communication levels, visual impairment, parent education, family income, were differentially related to scores for Aggression, SIB, and Stereotyped Behavior subscales on the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI-01) at initial interdisciplinary evaluation. BPI-01 scores decreased over the year for 57% of the children and increased for 43%. The amount of decrease on each BPI-01 subscale varied with age, gender, and diagnosis.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilitiesen_US
dc.rights©AAIDDen_US
dc.subjectAggressionen_US
dc.subjectSelf-injurious behavioren_US
dc.subjectStereotyped behavioren_US
dc.subjectInfantsen_US
dc.subjectToddlersen_US
dc.subjectIntellectual and developmental disabilitiesen_US
dc.titleRisk Factors for Self-Injury, Aggression, and Stereotyped Behavior Among Young Children At Risk for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorSchroeder, Stephen
kusw.kuauthorLeBlanc, Judith
kusw.kuauthorReese, Matthew
kusw.kuauthorBrady, Nancy C.
kusw.kudepartmentLife Span Instituteen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1352/1944-7558-119.4.351en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, author accepted manuscripten_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmidPMC5127691en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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