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dc.contributor.authorThati, Shara
dc.contributor.authorKuehl, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorHartwell, Brittany
dc.contributor.authorSestak, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorSiahaan, Teruna J.
dc.contributor.authorForrest, M. Laird
dc.contributor.authorBerkland, Cory J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-26T17:15:57Z
dc.date.available2017-04-26T17:15:57Z
dc.date.issued2015-02
dc.identifier.citationThati, S., Kuehl, C., Hartwell, B., Sestak, J., Siahaan, T., Forrest, L., & Berkland, C. (2015). Routes of Administration and Dose Optimization of Soluble Antigen Arrays in Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 104(2), 714–721. http://doi.org/10.1002/jps.24272en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/23812
dc.description.abstractSoluble Antigen Arrays (SAgAs) were developed for treating mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. SAgAs are composed of hyaluronan with grafted EAE antigen and LABL peptide (a ligand of ICAM-1). SAgA dose was tested by varying injection volume, SAgA concentration, and administration schedule. Routes of administration were explored to determine the efficacy of SAgAs when injected intramuscularly, subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, intravenously, or instilled into lungs. Injections proximal to the central nervous system (CNS) were compared to distal injection sites. Intravenous dosing was included to determine if SAgA efficiency results from systemic exposure. Pulmonary instillation was included since reports suggest T cells are licensed in the lungs before moving onto the CNS1,2. Decreasing the volume of injection or SAgA dose reduced treatment efficacy. Treating mice with a single injection on day 4, 7, or 10 also reduced efficacy compared to injecting on all three days. Surprisingly, changing the injection site did not lead to a significant difference in efficacy. Intravenous administration showed efficacy similar to other routes, suggesting SAgAs act systemically. When SAgAs were delivered via pulmonary instillation, however, EAE mice failed to develop any symptoms, suggesting a unique lung mechanism to ameliorate EAE in mice.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectHyaluronanen_US
dc.subjectExperimental autoimmune encephalomyelitisen_US
dc.subjectSJL miceen_US
dc.subjectHPLCen_US
dc.subjectFacilitated diffusion/transport; peptidesen_US
dc.subjectImmunologyen_US
dc.subjectBiomaterialsen_US
dc.subjectPolymeric drug delivery system*en_US
dc.titleRoutes of Administration and Dose Optimization of Soluble Antigen Arrays in Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorThati, Shara
kusw.kuauthorKuehl, Christopher
kusw.kuauthorHartwell, Brittany
kusw.kuauthorSestak, Joshua
kusw.kuauthorSiahaan, Teruna J.
kusw.kuauthorForrest, M. Laird
kusw.kuauthorBerkland, Cory J.
kusw.kudepartmentPharmaceutical Chemistryen_US
kusw.kudepartmentChemical and Petroleum Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jps.24272en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, author accepted manuscripten_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmidPMC4312227en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.