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dc.contributor.advisorFry, Mary D.
dc.contributor.authorHogue, Candace Marie
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-03T15:59:41Z
dc.date.available2012-06-03T15:59:41Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-31
dc.date.submitted2011
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:11837
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/9803
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine college students' stress responses, as measured by salivary cortisol, in a caring/task-involving climate compared to an ego-involving climate. In addition, the association between motivational climate and motivational responses (i.e., self-reported enjoyment, effort, anxiety, self-confidence, stress, shame, self-consciousness, and intent and excitement to continue juggling) were examined. Participants (n = 107; Mage =19.89 years) were separated by sex (i.e., male and female) and randomly assigned to either a caring/task- or an ego-involving motivational climate where they spent 30 minutes learning how to juggle. Seven salivary cortisol samples were collected over a 2-hour period. Results indicated that participating in the ego-involving climate elicited a significant salivary cortisol spike, while participating in the caring/task-involving climate led to a significant decrease in salivary cortisol levels. In addition, the ego-involving climate participants reported significantly higher levels of cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety, stress, shame, and self-consciousness, whereas the caring/task-involving climate participants reported significantly higher levels of effort, enjoyment, self-confidence, and interest and excitement in juggling in the future. The present study builds on goal perspective research by providing physiological evidence that participating in an ego-involving motivational climate can not only result in maladaptive motivational responses but may also elicit a significant cortisol spike.
dc.format.extent35 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectAchievement goal theory
dc.subjectCortisol
dc.subjectMotivational climate
dc.subjectSport performance
dc.subjectSport psychology
dc.subjectStress
dc.titleThe Influence of a Motivational Climate Intervention on Participant Salivary Cortisol and Motivational Responses
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberFry, Andrew
dc.contributor.cmtememberPressman, Sarah
dc.contributor.cmtememberLittle, Todd
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineHealth, Sport and Exercise Sciences
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.S.Ed.
kusw.oastatusna
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-0171-3817
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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