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dc.contributor.advisorSailor, Wayne S
dc.contributor.authorBezdek, Jamie Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-04T18:10:51Z
dc.date.available2011-08-04T18:10:51Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-25
dc.date.submitted2011
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:11496
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/7912
dc.description.abstractResponse to Intervention is an overall framework applicable to both behavioral and academic need and support (NASDSE, 2006). Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS), which also uses a multi-tiered system utilizing the same logic (Sailor, 2009), is often used as the behavioral framework nesting within RtI. Schools utilizing a system of Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support need to employ a universal screener to determine those students who are at risk for internalizing and externalizing challenging behaviors in order to provide these students with additional preventative supports. Office discipline referrals (ODRs) are a commonly used form of discipline, so the data they produce are readily available to researchers and school personnel. Using Messick's theory of validity, a specificity and sensitivity analysis were completed on ODRs as a screener using data from two diverse elementary schools with results of the Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders (SSBD) used as the reference standard. Over and underrepresentation of certain subgroups, including boys, members of racial minorities, and students with special education labels, were also examined. Results were interpreted in light of social and educational consequences. The sensitivity analysis for the overall student population (n=315) showed 43.6% of students were properly identified as needing support using the ODR system of screening. Correspondingly, the rate of false negatives for externalizing students was 42.3% (p<.01) and 84.6% (p<.01) for internalizing students. Given the consequences of failing to provide additional support for these students, as well as a host of other social and educational consequences resulting from use of ODR data, it is recommended that ODR data should not be used as a screener to identify students in need of behavioral support.
dc.format.extent112 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectBehavioral sciences
dc.subjectElementary education
dc.subjectEducational psychology
dc.subjectBehavior
dc.subjectPositive behavior support
dc.subjectResponse to intervention
dc.subjectSchoolwide positive behavior support
dc.subjectUniversal screener
dc.titleAn Examination of the Validity of Office Disciplinary Referrals (ODR) as a Behavioral Screener: A Descriptive Study
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberTurnbull, Rud
dc.contributor.cmtememberMcCart, Amy
dc.contributor.cmtememberWehmeyer, Michael
dc.contributor.cmtememberFrey, Bruce
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineSpecial Education
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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