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dc.contributor.advisorLiang, Jenn-Tai
dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Don W.
dc.contributor.authorBarati Ghahfarokhi, Reza
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-04T20:15:33Z
dc.date.available2011-07-04T20:15:33Z
dc.date.issued2010-12-10
dc.date.submitted2010
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:11273
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/7751
dc.description.abstractGuar-based polymer gels are used in the oil and gas industry to viscosify fluids used in hydraulic fracturing of production wells, in order to reduce leak-off of fluids and pressure, and improve the transport of proppants. After fracturing, the gel and associated filter cake must be degraded to very low viscosities using breakers to recover the hydraulic conductivity of the well. Enzymes are widely used to achieve this but injecting high concentrations of enzyme may result in premature degradation, or failure to gel; denaturation of enzymes at alkaline pH and high temperature conditions can also limit their applicability. In this study, application of polyelectrolyte nanoparticles for entrapping, carrying, releasing and protecting enzymes for fracturing fluids was examined. The objective of this research is to develop nano-sized carriers capable of carrying the enzymes to the filter cake, delaying the release of enzyme and protecting the enzyme against pH and temperature conditions inhospitable to native enzyme. Polyethylenimine-dextran sulfate (PEI-DS) polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) were used to entrap two enzymes commonly used in the oil industry in order to obtain delayed release and to protect the enzyme from conditions inhospitable to native enzyme. Stability and reproducibility of PEC nanoparticles was assured over time. An activity measurement method was used to measure the entrapment efficiency of enzyme using PEC nanoparticles. This method was confirmed using a concentration measurement method (SDS-PAGE). Entrapment efficiencies of pectinase and a commercial high-temperature enzyme mixture in polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles were maximized. Degradation, as revealed by reduction in viscoelastic moduli of borate-crosslinked hydroxypropyl guar (HPG) gel by commercial enzyme loaded in polyelectrolyte nanoparticles, was delayed, compared to equivalent systems where the enzyme mixture was not entrapped. This indicates that PEC nanoparticles delay the activity of enzymes by entrapping them. It was also observed that control PEC nanoparticles decreased both viscoelastic moduli, but with a slower rate compared to the PEC nanoparticles loaded with enzyme. Preparation shear and applied shear showed no significant effect on activity of enzyme-loaded PEC nanoparticles mixed with HPG solutions. However, fast addition of chemicals during the preparations showed smaller particle size compared to the drop-wise method. PEC nanoparticles (PECNPs) also protected both enzymes from denaturation at elevated temperature and pH. Following preparation, enzyme-loaded PEC nanoparticles were mixed with borate crosslinked HPG and the mixture was injected through a shear loop. Pectinase-loaded nanoparticles mixed with gelled HPG showed no sensitivity to shear applied along the shear loop at 25 °C. However, EL2X-loaded PEC nanoparticles showed sensitivity to shear applied along the shear loop at 40 °C. Filter cake was formed and degraded in a fluid loss cell for borate crosslinked HPG solutions mixed with either enzymes or enzyme-loaded PEC nanoparticles. Cleanup slopes of filter cake degraded using enzyme-loaded PEC nanoparticles and systems with enzymes mixed with HPG gel were significantly higher than for the filter cake formed with HPG gel mixed with no enzyme. In a different application, enzyme-loaded PEC nanoparticles showed significantly slower reduction in viscosity of HPG solution over time compared to the HPG systems mixed with enzyme. Increasing the viscosity of low concentration HPG, used as slick-water, decreases the proppant settling velocity. This is of specific interest in fracturing fluids used for unconventional reservoirs.
dc.format.extent266 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectPetroleum engineering
dc.subjectNanotechnology
dc.subjectDelivery
dc.subjectEnzyme
dc.subjectGuar
dc.subjectHydraulic fracture
dc.subjectNanoparticles
dc.subjectPolyelectrolyte
dc.titleFracturing Fluid Cleanup by Controlled Release of Enzymes from Polyelectrolyte Complex Nanoparticles
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberWillhite, G. Paul
dc.contributor.cmtememberMcCool, Stan
dc.contributor.cmtememberJohnson, Stephen J.
dc.contributor.cmtememberWalton, Anthony W.
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineChemical & Petroleum Engineering
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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