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dc.contributor.advisorWolf-Wendel, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorOtts, Cindy Denise
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-01T20:22:34Z
dc.date.available2011-02-01T20:22:34Z
dc.date.issued2010-12-12
dc.date.submitted2010
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:11267
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/7081
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship among math attitudes, self-regulated learning, and course outcomes in developmental math. Math attitudes involved perceived usefulness of math and math anxiety. Self-regulated learning represented the ability of students to control cognitive, metacognitive, and behavioral aspects of learning. The sample consisted of 376 students who were enrolled in developmental math courses at a community college. Although participants perceived math as fairly relevant to their lives, they did not experience much math anxiety. Participants were somewhat likely to engage in self-regulated learning, but the rates were not particularly high. Of the five self-regulated learning scales (metacognitive self-regulation, effort regulation, environmental management, peer help, and study strategies), students were most likely to regulate their effort and structure their learning environment. Findings from independent samples t-tests, one-way analyses of variance, and correlation analyses highlighted differences in math attitudes, self-regulated learning, and math outcomes based on demographic variables. First generation and part-time college students and students with dependents perceived math as more useful than their counterparts. Continuing generation and part-time students experienced higher levels of math anxiety than first generation and full-time students. Students who were female, non-traditional aged, married or divorced/separated, and those who had dependents were more likely to engage in self-regulatory strategies than their peers. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine a) the influence of math attitudes on self-regulated learning and b) the influence of self-regulated learning on final course grades in developmental math. Results indicated that attitudes toward math significantly predicted self-regulated learning and that self-regulated learning significantly predicted final course grades. Students who used self-regulatory strategies earned higher grades in developmental math courses. The results have implications for educational policy and practice. Developmental education programs should include instruction on self-regulatory strategies and should consider supplementing cognitive assessment measures with non-cognitive factors in order to better predict readiness for college coursework and academic potential.
dc.format.extent185 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectCommunity college education
dc.subjectAcademic success
dc.subjectDevelopmental education
dc.subjectDevelopmental math
dc.subjectMath attitudes
dc.subjectSelf-regulation
dc.titleSELF-REGULATION AND MATH ATTITUDES: EFFECTS ON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN DEVELOPMENTAL MATH COURSES
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberWolf-Wendel, Lisa
dc.contributor.cmtememberTwombly, Susan
dc.contributor.cmtememberKim, Dongbin
dc.contributor.cmtememberGay, Susan
dc.contributor.cmtememberCarlsen, Charles
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineEducational Leadership and Policy Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelEd.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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