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dc.contributor.advisorBanwart, Mary C.
dc.contributor.authorClune, Katie Fischer
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-18T04:31:20Z
dc.date.available2010-03-18T04:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2009-10-14
dc.date.submitted2009
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:10590
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/5973
dc.description.abstractInstructor credibility, or the degree to which an instructor is perceived by his or her students to be competent, to have character, and to be caring, is one of the most important variables affecting teacher-student interaction. However, gender role stereotypes may place female instructors at a disadvantage when it comes to perceptions of their credibility, as students may have difficulty seeing women in positions of authority as both competent and feminine. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between students' perceptions of instructors' credibility, gender role, and communication style; to analyze ways students describe their instructors; and to assess how well male and female instructors meet the expectations for a good instructor. This study found that good male instructors were more often considered credible and assertive, while good female instructors were more often considered caring and responsive. These findings are significant because they suggest students have different expectations for what constitutes good for a male instructor and what constitutes good for a female instructor.
dc.format.extent165 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectGender studies
dc.subjectEducational evaluation
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectCommunication
dc.subjectCommunication style
dc.subjectFemale professors
dc.subjectGender roles
dc.subjectInstructor credibility
dc.subjectTeacher credibility
dc.titleStudents' Perceptions of Instructor Credibility: Effects of Instructor Sex, Gender Role, and Communication Style
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberRusso, Tracy
dc.contributor.cmtememberFord, Debra
dc.contributor.cmtememberWolf-Wendel, Lisa
dc.contributor.cmtememberBruss, Kristine
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineCommunication Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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