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dc.contributor.advisorKarpowitz, Dennis H.
dc.contributor.advisorRhode, Paula C.
dc.contributor.authorChang, Olivia L.
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-18T04:00:22Z
dc.date.available2010-03-18T04:00:22Z
dc.date.issued2009-08-19
dc.date.submitted2009
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:10536
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/5952
dc.description.abstractObesity is a steadily growing epidemic with serious health related consequences. Over the last several decades, the treatment of obesity has evolved and now successfully yields weight losses of typically 5-10%. However, long-term weight loss maintenance remains elusive. Research has identified the strategies that are essential in maintaining weight loss, however an understanding of the psychological processes that drive these behaviors is lacking. It has been suggested that there is a fundamental difference between the processes that underlie the initiation of behavior change and the maintenance of these changes, and that little attention has been paid to the processes that sustain behavior change over time. The goals that individuals set, the expectations for attaining these goals, and the satisfaction associated with the outcome of these efforts may impact weight loss and weight loss maintenance. These constructs have been examined in the context of weight loss, but they have yet to be explored in the weight loss maintenance phase. This study examined the impact of goals, expectations, and satisfaction on weight loss maintenance in individuals who completed a weight loss program and were striving to maintain their weight losses. Participants included men and women (N = 67) who had recently lost at least 5% of their body weight. They were weighed and completed psychological measures at baseline, 2 months, and 4 months. Results indicated that there was no support for the hypothesis that goals, expectations, and satisfaction predict weight loss maintenance. In addition, goals and expectations for weight loss maintenance did not predict satisfaction with weight. Implications and future directions are discussed.
dc.format.extent136 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectClinical psychology
dc.subjectExpectations
dc.subjectGoals
dc.subjectSatisfaction
dc.subjectWeight loss maintenance
dc.titleGOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberHiggins, Raymond L.
dc.contributor.cmtememberKirk, Sarah
dc.contributor.cmtememberLichtenberg, James W.
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePsychology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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