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dc.contributor.advisorSeverson, Margaret
dc.contributor.advisorScanlon, Edward T.
dc.contributor.authorZoellner, Kendra Pennington
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-20T00:07:58Z
dc.date.available2010-01-20T00:07:58Z
dc.date.issued2009-12-08
dc.date.submitted2009
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:10462
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/5708
dc.description.abstractResearch with survivors of intimate partner violence has primarily focused on the outcome of leaving because it has been difficult for researchers in this area to determine which outcomes, if any, are the right outcomes to study. Changing the focus away from leaving and onto healing and recovery, or transformation, would help shift the burden of responsibility for leaving (or not leaving) away from survivors and create a more appropriate outcome focused on empowerment and healing. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the process of transformation that survivors of IPV go through as they reclaim their lives from an abusive partner. This dissertation presents the findings of a qualitative, constructivist inquiry with 16 survivors of intimate partner violence. Grounded theory analysis revealed a conceptual framework for the process of transformation that includes a four stage process as well as the context within which the process occurs. The stages include 1) loss of self, 2) shifts in thinking, 3) reclaiming self, and 4) reinventing identity. This conceptual framework provides an ecological view of survivors of IPV that addresses some of the major criticisms of qualitative process of leaving studies. This paper will provide an overview of the history of IPV, the scope and incidence of IPV, a review of the empirical and scholarly literature on the outcome of leaving, the methodology and findings from the inquiry, and implications for practice, policy, and research.
dc.format.extent241 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectSocial work
dc.subjectClinical psychology
dc.subjectAbuse
dc.subjectDomestic violence
dc.subjectHealing
dc.subjectIntimate partner violence
dc.subjectSurvivors
dc.subjectTransformation
dc.titleTHE LOSS, RECOVERY, AND REINVENTION OF SELF: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE PROCESS OF TRANSFORMATION
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberSeverson, Margaret
dc.contributor.cmtememberScanlon, Edward
dc.contributor.cmtememberAdams, Deborah
dc.contributor.cmtememberBiernat, Monica
dc.contributor.cmtememberKoenig, Terry
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineSocial Welfare
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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