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dc.contributor.advisorO'Brien, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorJohn, Tashina Marie
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-07T16:53:34Z
dc.date.available2010-01-07T16:53:34Z
dc.date.issued2009-06-12
dc.date.submitted2009
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:10360
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/5643
dc.description.abstractThe native language of the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska is Hocak, today an endangered language. The Hochungra, meaning "People of the Sacred Speech", originally came from present day central Wisconsin. This thesis first identified four factors important in language loss: movement out of environment, external duress, internal duress and loss of critical mass. A qualitative analysis of these factors to Hochunk history revealed that the first two factors most explained the decline in the Hocak language. These same factors, in reverse, also accounted for the Ho-Chunk's ability to better preserve the language.
dc.format.extent72 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectNative American studies
dc.subjectHo-chunk
dc.subjectHocak
dc.subjectWinnebago
dc.titlePeople of the Sacred Language: Revival of the Hocak Language
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberFitzgerald, Stephanie
dc.contributor.cmtememberNapier, Rita
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineIndigenous Nations Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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