Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorEkerdt, David J.
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Ann Marie
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-15T04:25:59Z
dc.date.available2008-09-15T04:25:59Z
dc.date.issued2008-08-18
dc.date.submitted2008
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations2.umi.com/ku:2631
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/4193
dc.description.abstractOlder adults' sexual health is becoming an increasingly important component of healthy aging in the wake of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and rising infection rates among this age cohort. However, research reveals that this population is often left out of HIV/AIDS public health policy and prevention education. This project uses qualitative methodology to analyze the possible social factors for this omission. To do this, I performed 31 interviews with key personnel at HIV/AIDS service organizations and state-level policymakers in four states in the Midwest. In addition, I conducted an in-depth organizational analysis of an AIDS service organization in one Midwestern state, undertook a content analysis of key funding and policy documents, and collected U.S. national and regional data on infection rates, risk behaviors, and other contributing factors to the rise of HIV/AIDS risk and infections among the older adult population. From the beginning of the epidemic in 1981, the seemingly disproportionate impact that HIV/AIDS had on specific segments of the population resulted in moral judgment of those who were infected. The association of HIV/AIDS with specific groups seen as being "high risk" resulted in certain segments of the population, such as older adults, being considered as low-risk for contracting the virus despite exhibiting high-risk behaviors. The responsibility of a national public health crisis fell squarely on the shoulders of community-based AIDS service organizations who received little fiscal support. The result was gaps in prevention education to certain segments of the population. The increase of HIV/AIDS diagnoses in the older adult population has ignited the need to understand the reasons why older adults have been omitted from HIV/AIDS policy. I examined the social forces that influence HIV/AIDS policy at the national, state, and community level. My findings reveal that HIV/AIDS policy at the national level influences the type of health promotion being done at the state and community levels. AIDS service organizations are held responsible for this national public health care crisis with too little funding. As a result, these organizations are not able to reach every at-risk group, including older adults.
dc.format.extent201 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectSociology
dc.subjectPublic and social welfare
dc.subjectOlder adults
dc.subjectHiv/aids
dc.subjectPrevention
dc.subjectSexual scripts
dc.subjectOrganizations
dc.titleThe 'Graying' of an Epidemic: Sexual Scripts, Public Health Influences, and the Organizational Impact on HIV/AIDS Education and Prevention for Older Adults in the Midwest
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberDonovan, Brian
dc.contributor.cmtememberNagel, Joane
dc.contributor.cmtememberZimmerman, Mary K.
dc.contributor.cmtememberChapin, Rosemary
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineSociology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPH.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record