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dc.contributor.advisorRoberts, Michael C.
dc.contributor.authorMashunkashey-Shadlow, Joanna
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-05T03:13:13Z
dc.date.available2008-08-05T03:13:13Z
dc.date.issued2007-09-25
dc.date.submitted2007
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:2225
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/4031
dc.description.abstractNative Americans are at greater risk for trauma and negative mental health outcomes than the general population. Several protective factors have been identified within the Native American culture that may aid in decreasing mental health disparities. Some of these protective factors appear to be closely linked to positive psychology, specifically hope theory. To date, no published studies have examined hope within Native American children for any time frame greater than a one-month period. The primary purpose of this study was to examine hope in Native American children over a longer period of time. Participants were 47 Native American adolescents from the Midwest who were assessed at two time periods approximately three years apart. Results indicated that hope remains constant over time. Post hoc analyses suggested that a decrease in levels of hope appears as age increases. This study provides preliminary information about the trajectory of hope in Native American children, and adds to the cultural diversity in positive psychology literature. Results support the incorporation of positive psychology concepts as potential protective factors into mental health treatments for Native American adolescents. Implications and future research directions are discussed.
dc.format.extent65 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectClinical psychology
dc.subjectNative American
dc.subjectHope
dc.subjectAcculturation
dc.subjectAcculturative stress
dc.subjectChildren
dc.titleA Longitudinal Study of Hope in Native American Children and Adolescents
dc.typeDissertation
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePsychology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPH.D.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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