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dc.contributor.advisorSchrock, Steven
dc.contributor.authorBundy, Brandon
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-14T23:18:52Z
dc.date.available2008-07-14T23:18:52Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-30
dc.date.submitted2008
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:2518
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/3956
dc.description.abstractPedestrian countdown timers (CDTs) are promoted as a means of improving pedestrian safety at intersections. However, there are concerns that drivers view the CDTs when approaching the intersection and use that information to drive more aggressively - an unintended consequence that is detrimental to safety. Pedestrian CDTs have been in use in Lawrence, Kansas for at least three years, and so any novelty effect should have passed, allowing for an accurate analysis of the long-term effects of the devices on traffic. Four intersections along an arterial corridor in Lawrence were studied - two with CDTs and two with flashing hand pedestrian signal heads. Continuous speed data were collected on approaching traffic and analyzed to determine if there were changes in speed between 400 ft upstream from the intersection (the point when the CDT information could be read by drivers) and the intersection stop bar. Additionally, the ultimate decision of the drivers (whether they stopped or not) was recorded. Analysis revealed that drivers were less likely to increase their approach speed when a CDT was present. Additionally, some drivers began to slow to a stop before the beginning of the amber phase when CDTs were present. These findings indicate that drivers use the information provided from pedestrian CDTs to improve their driving decisions. Even though the CDT information was not intended to be used by drivers, it appears that they are indeed doing so in a way that results in safer driving actions.
dc.format.extent82 pages
dc.language.isoEN
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectCivil engineering
dc.subjectTransportation
dc.subjectPedestrian
dc.subjectCountdown timer
dc.subjectCdt
dc.subjectDriver behavior
dc.subjectDriver modification
dc.titleModification of Driver Behavior Based on Information from Pedestrian Countdown Timers
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberMulinazzi, Thomas E.
dc.contributor.cmtememberYoung, Bryan
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineCivil, Environmental, & Architectural Engineering
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.S.
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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