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dc.contributor.authorThomas, M'Balia
dc.date.accessioned2023-05-22T16:48:54Z
dc.date.available2023-05-22T16:48:54Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-19
dc.identifier.citationThomas, M'Balia. Dialogue as Black Contemplative Practice, The Journal of Contemplative Inquiry, vol. 9, no. 1, https://journal.contemplativeinquiry.org/index.php/joci/article/view/331.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1808/34199
dc.description.abstractAcross space, time, and texts, I have engaged in contemplative dialogue with the writings of four writers—Black feminist poet Audre Lorde; Chicana poet Gloria Anzaldúa; artist, activist, and community healer Tricia Hersey; and novelist Andrea Lee. In doing so, I have participated in a contemplative practice that is culturally attuned to me as an African American woman as their writings—in different ways—are in dialogue with Black feminist thought, womanism, and Afrofuturism. Through these authors and their works, I have found the wisdom, comfort, othermothering, and language I have needed to make sense of my journey as an early career scholar on the tenure track and to become a more authentic, compassionate, and whole teacher-scholar.en_US
dc.publisherThe Center for Contemplative Mind in Societyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://journal.contemplativeinquiry.org/index.php/joci/article/view/331en_US
dc.rights© The Center for Contemplative Mind in Societyen_US
dc.subjectDialogueen_US
dc.subjectOthermotheringen_US
dc.subjectBlack contemplative practiceen_US
dc.subjectBlack feminist thoughten_US
dc.titleDialogue as Black Contemplative Practiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorThomas, M'Balia
kusw.kudepartmentCurriculum and Teachingen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-4354-2796en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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