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dc.contributor.authorWineinger, Troy O.
dc.contributor.authorFry, Mary D.
dc.contributor.authorMoore, E. Whitney G.
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-06T19:35:41Z
dc.date.available2023-02-06T19:35:41Z
dc.date.issued2022-11-01
dc.identifier.citationWineinger, Troy O et al. “The Influence of Instructor Behaviors and the Perceived Motivational Climate on Undergraduate Students' Experiences in College STEM Laboratories.” CBE life sciences education vol. 21,4 (2022): ar81. doi:10.1187/cbe.21-07-0184en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/33746
dc.description.abstractBiology laboratory instructors play a key role in creating an optimal environment where college students try hard and enjoy their classroom experiences. This study used achievement goal perspective theory to examine the influence of instructor behaviors on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students’ perceptions of the motivational climate (caring, task, ego) and their adaptive (i.e., effort, enjoyment, performance self-esteem, and social self-esteem) and maladaptive (i.e., shame) experiences in the biology laboratory setting. Students (N = 563; women, 65%; men, 35%) enrolled in biology laboratory courses voluntarily completed a survey during the final week of the semester. Results of two structural equation modeling analyses across gender and racial identities made two important contributions to the STEM higher education literature: 1) when instructors engaged in effective teaching behaviors, students were more likely to perceive a caring/task-involving climate and, in turn, report adaptive motivational responses (i.e., increased effort, enjoyment, self-esteem; decreased shame); and 2) neither gender nor race moderated the measurement of the latent parameters. This research has important pedagogical implications, as teaching assistants could be trained to engage in these effective behaviors to optimize students’ STEM learning experiences.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Cell Biologyen_US
dc.rights© 2022 T. O. Wineinger et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2022 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 4.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0en_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Instructor Behaviors and the Perceived Motivational Climate on Undergraduate Students’ Experiences in College STEM Laboratoriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorWineinger, Troy O.
kusw.kuauthorFry, Mary D.
kusw.kudepartmentHealth, Sport & Exercise Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1187/cbe.21-07-0184en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmidPMC9727598en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© 2022 T. O. Wineinger et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2022 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 4.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2022 T. O. Wineinger et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2022 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 4.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0).