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dc.contributor.authorSoehlke, Lauren E.
dc.contributor.authorKamat, Ashwini
dc.contributor.authorCastro, Nichol
dc.contributor.authorVitevitch, Michael S.
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-06T17:27:03Z
dc.date.available2023-02-06T17:27:03Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-26
dc.identifier.citationSoehlke, L.E., Kamat, A., Castro, N. et al. The influence of memory on the speech-to-song illusion. Mem Cogn 50, 1804–1815 (2022). https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-021-01269-9en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/33737
dc.description.abstractIn the speech-to-song illusion a spoken phrase is presented repeatedly and begins to sound as if it is being sung. Anecdotal reports suggest that subsequent presentations of a previously heard phrase enhance the illusion, even if several hours or days have elapsed between presentations. In Experiment 1, we examined in a controlled laboratory setting whether memory traces for a previously heard phrase would influence song-like ratings to a subsequent presentation of that phrase. The results showed that word lists that were played several times throughout the experimental session were rated as being more song-like at the end of the experiment than word lists that were played only once in the experimental session. In Experiment 2, we examined if the memory traces that influenced the speech-to-song illusion were abstract in nature or exemplar-based by playing some word lists several times during the experiment in the same voice and playing other word lists several times during the experiment but in different voices. The results showed that word lists played in the same voice were rated as more song-like at the end of the experiment than word lists played in different voices. Many previous studies have examined how various aspects of the stimulus itself influences the perception of the speech-to-song illusion. The results of the present experiments demonstrate that memory traces of the stimulus also influence the speech-to-song illusion.en_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectMusic cognitionen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectPsycholinguisticsen_US
dc.titleThe influence of memory on the speech-to-song illusionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorSoehlke, Lauren E.
kusw.kuauthorKamat, Ashwini
kusw.kuauthorVitevitch, Michael S.
kusw.kudepartmentPsychologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/s13421-021-01269-9en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmidPMC9767999en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.