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dc.contributor.authorAdaryukov, James
dc.contributor.authorGrunevski, Sergej
dc.contributor.authorReed, Derek D.
dc.contributor.authorPleskac, Timothy J.
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-13T19:32:42Z
dc.date.available2022-07-13T19:32:42Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-06
dc.identifier.citationAdaryukov J, Grunevski S, Reed DD, Pleskac TJ (2022) I’m wearing a mask, but are they?: Perceptions of self-other differences in COVID-19 health behaviors. PLoS ONE 17(6): e0269625. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0269625en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/32849
dc.description.abstractAs information about COVID-19 safety behavior changed, people had to judge how likely others were to protect themselves through mask-wearing and vaccination seeking. In a large, campus-wide survey, we assessed whether University of Kansas students viewed others’ protective behaviors as different from their own, how much students assumed others shared their beliefs and behaviors, and which individual differences were associated with those estimations. Participants in our survey (N = 1, 704; 81.04% white, 64.08% female) estimated how likely they and others were to have worn masks on the University of Kansas campus, have worn masks off-campus, and to seek a vaccine. They also completed measures of political preference, numeracy, and preferences for risk in various contexts. We found that participants estimated that others were less likely to engage in health safety behaviors than themselves, but that their estimations of others were widely shared. While, in general, participants saw themselves as more unique in terms of practicing COVID-19 preventative behaviors, more liberal participants saw themselves as more unique, while those that were more conservative saw their own behavior as more similar to others. At least for masking, this uniqueness was false—estimates of others’ health behavior were lower than their actual rates. Understanding this relationship could allow for more accurate norm-setting and normalization of mask-wearing and vaccination.en_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.rights© 2022 Adaryukov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.titleI’m wearing a mask, but are they?: Perceptions of self-other differences in COVID-19 health behaviorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorAdaryukov, James
kusw.kuauthorGrunevski, Sergej
kusw.kuauthorReed, Derek D.
kusw.kuauthorPleskac, Timothy J.
kusw.kudepartmentBrain, Behavior, and Quantitative Sciences Programen_US
kusw.kudepartmentPsychologyen_US
kusw.kudepartmentApplied Behavioral Sciencesen_US
kusw.kudepartmentCofrin Logan Center for Addiction Research and Treatmenten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0269625en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/ 0000-0002-4081-8697en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/ 0000-0002-2355-0502en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid35666754en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© 2022 Adaryukov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2022 Adaryukov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.