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dc.contributor.authorGulbranson, Erik L.
dc.contributor.authorMellum, Morgan M.
dc.contributor.authorCorti, Valentina
dc.contributor.authorDahlseid, Aidan
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, Brian A.
dc.contributor.authorRyberg, Patricia E.
dc.contributor.authorCornamusini, Gianluca
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-08T18:30:34Z
dc.date.available2022-07-08T18:30:34Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-24
dc.identifier.citationGulbranson EL, Mellum MM, Corti V, Dahlseid A, Atkinson BA, Ryberg PE, Cornamusini G. Paleoclimate-induced stress on polar forested ecosystems prior to the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Sci Rep. 2022 May 24;12(1):8702. doi: 10.1038/s41598-022-12842-w. PMID: 35610472; PMCID: PMC9130125.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/32805
dc.description.abstractThe end-Permian extinction (EPE) has been considered to be contemporaneous on land and in the oceans. However, re-examined floristic records and new radiometric ages from Gondwana indicate a nuanced terrestrial ecosystem response to EPE global change. Paleosol geochemistry and climate simulations indicate paleoclimate change likely caused the demise of the widespread glossopterid ecosystems in Gondwana. Here, we evaluate the climate response of plants to the EPE via dendrochronology snapshots to produce annual-resolution records of tree-ring growth for a succession of late Permian and early Middle Triassic fossil forests from Antarctica. Paleosol geochemistry indicates a shift in paleoclimate towards more humid conditions in the Early and early Middle Triassic relative to the late Permian. Paleosol morphology, however, supports inferences of a lack of forested ecosystems in the Early Triassic. The plant responses to this paleoclimate change were accompanied by enhanced stress during the latest Permian as determined by high-resolution paleoclimate analysis of wood growth intervals. These results suggest that paleoclimate change during the late Permian exerted significant stress on high-latitude forests, consistent with the hypothesis that climate change was likely the primary driver of the extinction of the glossopterid ecosystems.en_US
dc.publisherNature Researchen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectPalaeoclimateen_US
dc.subjectPalaeoecologyen_US
dc.titlePaleoclimate-induced stress on polar forested ecosystems prior to the Permian–Triassic mass extinctionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorAtkinson, Brian A.
kusw.kudepartmentEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-022-12842-wen_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid35610472en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© The Author(s) 2022.  This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.