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dc.contributor.authorClary, David A.
dc.contributor.editorClark, John G.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-24T17:46:39Z
dc.date.available2021-11-24T17:46:39Z
dc.date.issued1988-12-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/32203
dc.descriptionDavid A. Clary, former chief historian of the US Forest Service, is the author or coauthor of several books on American history, including The Place Where Hell Bubbled Up: A History of the First National Park and Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship That Saved the Revolution.en_US
dc.description.abstractNearly one-quarter of America is covered with forests almost 800 million acres. There are 151 national forests, comprising close to 200 million acres in thirty-nine states and Puerto Rico. These protected lands are administered by the U.S. Forest Service, an agency of the Department of Agriculture. David Clary here examines the history of and controversies surrounding the Forest Services policies for timber management in our national forests. In this first in-depth study of the political, bureaucratic, social, and ideological relationships between the Forest Service and the production of timber, Clary traces the continuity in the agency's outlook from its creation in 1905 through fears of a timber famine to the clear-cutting controversies of the mid 1970s. He shows convincingly that, despite legislative remedies and agency reports, timber production has remained the agency's first priority and that other (multiple uses recreation, watershed protection, wilderness, livestock grazing, and wildlife management were regulated so that they would not interfere with potential timber harvests. Throughout its history, the agency is shown to have been enchanted with the objective of producing timber. Clary's theme, in what he describes as an administrative, political, scientific, and anecdotal history, is that the Forest Service exhibited consistent actions and attitudes over the years and failed to confront realistically changes in the national culture that altered what the American people wanted from the forests and the Forest Service.en_US
dc.format.extentxvi, 256
dc.publisherUniversity Press of Kansasen_US
dc.rights© 1986 by the University Press of Kansasen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0en_US
dc.titleTimber and the Forest Serviceen_US
dc.typeBooken_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


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© 1986 by the University Press of Kansas
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 1986 by the University Press of Kansas