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dc.contributor.advisorChoi, Won S
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Lucas
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-20T21:46:06Z
dc.date.available2021-07-20T21:46:06Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-31
dc.date.submitted2021
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:17701
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/31778
dc.description.abstractPurpose:3D printing has been incorporated by the surgical community for a variety of different applications including the creation of anatomic models for use in preoperative planning. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact on procedure time ionizing radiation exposure, intravascular contrast dosage, fluoroscopy time, and provider confidence in use of a 3D printed anatomic models in pre-procedure planning in interventional radiology. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement, endovascular stent repair, or prostate artery embolism were included. A quasi-experimental design was used. For the control group, retrospective data was collected on patients who received the procedures prior to Oct 1, 2020. For the experimental group, a model was created for every patient that received one of the procedures of interest between Oct 1, 2020 and April 15, 2021. Data was collected on patient demographics and procedure details. The interventionalist was surveyed on their confidence level and model usage following each procedure. Results: 3D prints were created for six TIPS and one PAE patient. In the TIPS group, mean ionizing radiation exposure was 808.8 mGy in the group with a model compared to 1731.7 mGy without (p= 0.09). Twelve survey responses were received and 91.7% reported either “increased” or “significantly increased” confidence after reviewing the 3D model. Conclusion: Including 3D printed models in the planning of endovascular procedures may provide improved patient care while potentially optimizing procedural efficiency. Study including more patients is needed and currently in process to better measure this. Initial preliminary procedural data demonstrates increased value, while secondary findings of operator satisfaction and overall benefit to trainees is also promising.
dc.format.extent32 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectMedicine
dc.subjectMedical imaging
dc.subjectSurgery
dc.subject3D printing
dc.subjectEndovascular
dc.subjectInterventional radiology
dc.subjectPercutaneous
dc.subjectPlanning
dc.subjectRadiology
dc.titleUtilizing 3D Printing to Assist Planning of Percutaneous/Endovascular Procedures in Interventional Radiology
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberRohr, Aaron M
dc.contributor.cmtememberFitzgerald-Wolff, Sharon A
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePopulation Health
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.S.
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3130-8019
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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