Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKritee, Kritee
dc.contributor.authorNair, Drishya
dc.contributor.authorZavala-Araiza, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorProville, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorRudek, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorAdhya, Tapan K.
dc.contributor.authorLoecke, Terrance D.
dc.contributor.authorEsteves, Tashina
dc.contributor.authorBalireddygari, Shalini
dc.contributor.authorDava, Obulapathi
dc.contributor.authorRam, Karthik
dc.contributor.authorAbhilash, S. R.
dc.contributor.authorMadasamy, Murugan
dc.contributor.authorDokka, Ramakrishna V.
dc.contributor.authorAnandaraj, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorAthiyaman, D.
dc.contributor.authorReddy, Malla
dc.contributor.authorAhuja, Richie
dc.contributor.authorHamburg, Steven P.
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-07T20:33:56Z
dc.date.available2021-05-07T20:33:56Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-25
dc.identifier.citationKritee Kritee, Drishya Nair, Daniel Zavala-Araiza, Jeremy Proville, Joseph Rudek, Tapan K. Adhya, Terrance Loecke, Tashina Esteves, Shalini Balireddygari, Obulapathi Dava, Karthik Ram, Abhilash S. R., Murugan Madasamy, Ramakrishna V. Dokka, Daniel Anandaraj, D. Athiyaman, Malla Reddy, Richie Ahuja, Steven P. Hamburg, "High nitrous oxide fluxes from rice indicate the need to manage water for both long- and short-term climate impacts", Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Sep 2018, 115 (39) 9720-9725; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1809276115en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/31627
dc.description.abstractGlobal rice cultivation is estimated to account for 2.5% of current anthropogenic warming because of emissions of methane (CH4), a short-lived greenhouse gas. This estimate assumes a widespread prevalence of continuous flooding of most rice fields and hence does not include emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a long-lived greenhouse gas. Based on the belief that minimizing CH4 from rice cultivation is always climate beneficial, current mitigation policies promote increased use of intermittent flooding. However, results from five intermittently flooded rice farms across three agroecological regions in India indicate that N2O emissions per hectare can be three times higher (33 kg-N2O⋅ha−1⋅season−1) than the maximum previously reported. Correlations between N2O emissions and management parameters suggest that N2O emissions from rice across the Indian subcontinent might be 30–45 times higher under intensified use of intermittent flooding than under continuous flooding. Our data further indicate that comanagement of water with inorganic nitrogen and/or organic matter inputs can decrease climate impacts caused by greenhouse gas emissions up to 90% and nitrogen management might not be central to N2O reduction. An understanding of climate benefits/drawbacks over time of different flooding regimes because of differences in N2O and CH4 emissions can help select the most climate-friendly water management regimes for a given area. Region-specific studies of rice farming practices that map flooding regimes and measure effects of multiple comanaged variables on N2O and CH4 emissions are necessary to determine and minimize the climate impacts of rice cultivation over both the short term and long term.en_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS. This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectRiceen_US
dc.subjectNitrous oxideen_US
dc.subjectMethaneen_US
dc.subjectAlternate wetting and dryingen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.titleHigh nitrous oxide fluxes from rice indicate the need to manage water for both long- and short-term climate impactsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorLoecke, Terrance D.
kusw.kudepartmentKansas Biological Surveyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1809276115en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9544-9078en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9861-5115en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS. This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS. This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND).