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dc.contributor.advisorAlexander, Shawn L
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, Owen
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-07T20:42:41Z
dc.date.available2021-02-07T20:42:41Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-31
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:16720
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/31380
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates the role of transnational interactions and solidarity as central components to the Black Power movement in the United States and Brazil. Beginning with Brazilian artists and political radicals traveling and dialoguing with African American radicals in the United States and Cuba, chapter one traces the development of Black Power ideology in Brazil during the military dictatorship. Chapter two explores Robert F. Williams and the Revolutionary Action Movement (RAM) as architects of Black Power Revolutionary Transnationalism. They put the revolutionary potential of African Americans into the context of the decolonizing world and as a result influenced the development of an Afro-Brazilian RAM cell that would further challenge the military dictatorship. The final chapter highlights the centrality of transnational worker solidarity to the Black Power movement. As black workers gained power via unions in Brazil, their counterparts in the United States faced exclusion. But, during the dictatorship, the League of Revolutionary Black Workers called for solidarity and the organization of autoworkers in Brazil.
dc.format.extent107 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectAfrican American studies
dc.subjectBlack studies
dc.subjectBlack history
dc.subjectBlack Power
dc.subjectLabor
dc.subjectLeague of Revolutionary Black Workers
dc.subjectRadicalism
dc.subjectRevolutionary Action Movement
dc.subjectTransnationalism
dc.titleRevolutionary TransNationalism: The Revolutionary Action Movement, the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, and the Black Power Movement in the United States and Brazil, 1961-1972
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberDandridge, Deborah
dc.contributor.cmtememberEsch, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.cmtememberde Andrade Tosta, Antonio Luciano
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineAfrican/African-American Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3819-968X
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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