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dc.contributor.advisorBiernat, Monica
dc.contributor.authorPeacock, Navanté Kentrell
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-21T18:16:55Z
dc.date.available2020-03-21T18:16:55Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-31
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:16598
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/30093
dc.description.abstractWhen asked to rate anti-Black and anti-White discrimination across six decades (the 50s – 00s), research suggests that Whites (but not Blacks) see discrimination as a zero-sum game that they have been losing since the 2000s (Norton & Sommers, 2011). However, data from other work suggests that White people do not believe Whites are discriminated against more than Blacks when rating perceived discrimination occurring today and in the future (Craig & Richeson, 2017). To investigate these discrepant findings, across two studies I examined how temporal framing, race, and other factors influence perceptions of anti-White and anti-Black discrimination. In Study 1 I found that temporal framing did not affect perceptions of discrimination. Also, although mean scores converge, Whites perceived more anti-Black than anti-White discrimination occurring today. Blacks also perceived higher levels of anti-Black than anti-White discrimination today, but to a greater extent than Whites. In Study 2 I found that the domain in which discrimination is considered (e.g., education and employment, criminal justice) affects Whites’ perceptions of anti-Black and anti-White discrimination today, with greater perception of rising anti-White and declining anti-Black discrimination in the education and employment domain. However, across both studies, only White Republicans (and in Study 2, Whites endorsing system-legitimizing beliefs) reported that Whites are discriminated against more than Blacks. These findings provide a better understanding of who is likely to perceive that Whites as a group face more discrimination than Blacks, and when these perceptions are likely to occur.
dc.format.extent67 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectSocial psychology
dc.subjectanti-Black
dc.subjectanti-White
dc.subjectDiscrimination
dc.subjectDomain
dc.subjectPerceptions
dc.titleA Matter of Time? Temporal Framing, Race, and the Perception of Anti-Black and Anti-White Discrimination
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberMolina, Ludwin E
dc.contributor.cmtememberAdams, Glenn
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplinePsychology
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
dc.identifier.orcid


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