Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCoughlin, Caitlin E.
dc.contributor.authorFiorentino, Robert
dc.contributor.authorRoyle, Phaedra
dc.contributor.authorKarsten, Steinhauer
dc.contributor.editorThierry, Guillaume
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-06T15:22:20Z
dc.date.available2019-09-06T15:22:20Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-20
dc.identifier.citationCoughlin CE, Fiorentino R, Royle P and Steinhauer K (2019) Sensitivity to Inflectional Morphology in a Non-native Language: Evidence From ERPs. Front. Commun. 4:21. doi: 10.3389/fcomm.2019.00021en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/29543
dc.descriptionA grant from the One-University Open Access Fund at the University of Kansas was used to defray the author's publication fees in this Open Access journal. The Open Access Fund, administered by librarians from the KU, KU Law, and KUMC libraries, is made possible by contributions from the offices of KU Provost, KU Vice Chancellor for Research & Graduate Studies, and KUMC Vice Chancellor for Research. For more information about the Open Access Fund, please see http://library.kumc.edu/authors-fund.xml.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe extent to which non-native speakers are sensitive to morphological structure during language processing remains a matter of debate. The present study used a masked-priming lexical decision task with simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) recording to investigate whether native and non-native speakers of French yield similar or different behavioral and brain-level responses to inflected verbs. The results from reaction time and EEG analyses indicate that both native and non-native French speakers were indeed sensitive to morphological structure, and that this sensitivity cannot be explained simply by the presence of orthographic or semantic overlap between prime and target. Moreover, sensitivity to morphological structure in non-native speakers was not influenced by proficiency (as reflected by the N400); lower-level learners show similar sensitivity at the word level as very advanced learners. These results demonstrate that native-like processing of inflectional morphology is possible in adult learners, even at lower levels of proficiency, which runs counter to proposals suggesting that native-like processing of inflection is beyond non-native speakers' reach.

The question of whether or not adult learners of a second language can decompose inflected words (e.g., walked) into morphological constituents (walk+-ed) and access morphological-level representations in the lexicon has received much attention in recent years. Some researchers propose that, like native speakers, second language (L2) learners are indeed sensitive to the morphological structure of inflected forms, and process complex forms via their morphological constituents (e.g., Basnight-Brown et al., 2007; Feldman et al., 2010; Coughlin and Tremblay, 2015), although it has been suggested that this may only be possible at high levels of proficiency (e.g., Ullman, 2005; Bowden et al., 2010; Babcock et al., 2012). By contrast, other researchers have proposed that adult L2 learners are insensitive to inflectional morphological structure due to a deficient grammar, and this deficiency is not predicted to improve with increased proficiency (e.g., Silva and Clahsen, 2008; Neubauer and Clahsen, 2009; Clahsen et al., 2010; Jacob et al., 2013, 2018). While some studies have found evidence of non-native speakers decomposing derived words (e.g., Silva and Clahsen, 2008; Jacob et al., 2018), many studies fail to find evidence for inflectional morphology decomposition. Given mixed results from recent studies, our current understanding of how non-native speakers process morphologically complex words remains unclear. The present study used a masked-priming lexical decision task during EEG recording to investigate how native and non-native French speakers process verbal inflection morphology. The combined use of masked priming and EEG allows one to test not only whether learners are able to show native-like sensitivity to inflectional morphology in their behavioral responses, but also whether their brain responses are indeed qualitatively similar to those of native speakers.
en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCanada Research Chair program/CIHR project # 950-209843en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCanada Foundation for Innovation (CFI/CRC project #201876)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNatural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC, grant # RGPINN 402678-11)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFQRSC team grant # 2016-SE-188196en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Kansas Doctoral student Research Fund, Department of Linguisticsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKU Open access Author Funden_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLanguage Sciences;4;21
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcomm.2019.00021/full#h1en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 Coughlin, Fiorentino, Royle and Steinhauer. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectMorphological primingen_US
dc.subjectinflectional morphologyen_US
dc.subjectERPsen_US
dc.subjectsecond languageen_US
dc.subjectFrenchen_US
dc.titleSensitivity to Inflectional Morphology in a Non-native Language: Evidence From ERPsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorCoughlin, Caitlin E.
kusw.kuauthorFiorentino, Robert
kusw.kudepartmentLinguisticsen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fcomm.2019.00021en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccessen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © 2019 Coughlin, Fiorentino, Royle and Steinhauer. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: Copyright © 2019 Coughlin, Fiorentino, Royle and Steinhauer. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.