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dc.contributor.advisorWegner, Jane R
dc.contributor.authorWalters, Karleen
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-12T19:36:11Z
dc.date.available2019-05-12T19:36:11Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-31
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:15845
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/27942
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the perspectives of families of children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The study sought information regarding a) the frequency of AAC (specifically SGDs) being offered as an intervention tool for CAS to families, b) the information and support provided to families in regard to AAC, and c) families’ perspectives of AAC as an intervention tool for CAS. A survey entitled “CAS and AAC: Family perspectives” was hosted online via Qualtrics. Family participation was solicited with help from organizations that support individuals with CAS at national, state and local levels. A total of 303 participants responded to the survey and 196 completed the survey. The data revealed that the majority of families do not have a child who used AAC, stating that a lack of information regarding the benefits and implementation of AAC in their child’s speech therapy and the lack of information regarding funding were reasons for not wanting to obtain a device for their child. Those that did have AAC primarily reported wanting and needing further information and support from professionals on how to implement their child’s device at home. The families that had been provided with support and training and reported that their child’s device was being incorporated in their speech services were more likely to note improvements in their child’s communication than those that had not received training or support. Speech-language pathologists and other related service professionals could use the data obtained in this study to improve their service delivery models for children with CAS and their families by increasing their knowledge related to AAC technology and the benefits of a multi-modal approach to therapy. Speech-language pathologists who provide services to children with CAS iv should have knowledge and experience with AAC in order to discern which child would benefit from a multi-modal approach in their intervention plan.
dc.format.extent82 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectSpeech therapy
dc.subjectAAC
dc.subjectAugmentative and Alternative Communication
dc.subjectCAS
dc.subjectChildhood Apraxia of Speech
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectPerspectives
dc.titleChildhood Apraxia of Speech and Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Family Perspectives
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberWaggoner, Peggy
dc.contributor.cmtememberPederson, Kris
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineIntercampus Program in Communicative Disorders
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.A.
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6400-1123
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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