Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorStehno-Bittel, Lisa
dc.contributor.advisorFriis, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Stephen Michael
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-07T15:37:13Z
dc.date.available2019-05-07T15:37:13Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-31
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:15303
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/27797
dc.description.abstractIslet transplantation as a treatment for type-1 diabetes in humans has reached a plateau, and major breakthroughs in stem-cell based therapies and immunoprotection strategies are now needed to advance the field. The primary goal within this dissertation was to approach innovation in islet transplantation from a new perspective: veterinary medicine and canine diabetes. Canine diabetes, while strikingly similar to type-1 diabetes in humans, has been entirely overlooked as a market for islet transplantation, and is in significant need of better treatment options. The obvious clinical need and regulatory advantage in veterinary medicine creates an attractive environment to cultivate much needed innovation in the field of islet transplantation. This overall goal was addressed with the following specific aims: 1] develop and optimize practical, ethical, and cost effective methods for obtaining transplant quality islets from canine donors 2] demonstrate and evaluate long-term efficacy of an alternative (non-alginate) hydrogel for immunoprotected islet transplantation in an allogeneic diabetic rat model 3] develop a non-toxic, simple, and readily translatable method for fabricating hydrogel (non-alginate) microspheres for cell encapsulation and delivery In accomplishing these aims, significant groundwork for islet transplantation as a treatment option for diabetic canines has been laid. A major focus of this research was in the evaluation and development of an islet encapsulation system based on a hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel as an alternative to standard alginate microspheres. Islets transplanted within the HA gel reversed diabetes in immune competent allogeneic rats for a minimum of 10 months. In light of these results, I developed, characterized, and patented a novel method for producing islet-laden HA hydrogel microspheres designed for use with readily available materials and cGMP complaint equipment. Furthermore, this novel method has great potential as a platform technology for generating cell-laden hydrogel microspheres using a variety of biomaterials for broad application in regenerative medicine and three-dimensional tissue culture.
dc.format.extent194 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.subjectCellular biology
dc.subjectChemical engineering
dc.subjecthydrogel
dc.subjectislet isolation
dc.subjectislet transplantation
dc.subjectmicroencapsulation
dc.titleAdvances in Islet Transplantation Including Development of a Novel Cell Encapsulation Platform for the Treatment of Diabetic Pets
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberStehno-Bittel, Lisa
dc.contributor.cmtememberFriis, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.cmtememberWilson, Sara
dc.contributor.cmtememberGehrke, Stevin
dc.contributor.cmtememberPaul, Argya
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineBioengineering
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
dc.identifier.orcid
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record