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dc.contributor.advisorTran, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorBajwa, Amandeep Singh
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-25T20:44:32Z
dc.date.available2019-04-25T20:44:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-31
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:16317
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/27771
dc.description.abstractIn the transportation construction industry, emerging technologies have changed how state departments of transportation (DOTs) deliver highway construction projects. New and innovative technologies continue to be introduced, improved, and implemented for highway construction and their use has resulted in faster, more accurate, and more efficient planning, design, and construction. As the highway construction industry infuses more technologies into the process of project delivery, state DOTs have an opportunity to realize improved project performance regarding cost, schedule, and quality. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Every Day Counts (EDC) initiatives promote the use of various advanced and emerging technologies (e.g., automated machine guidance, unmanned aircraft systems, building information modeling, handheld instruments and devices, and work zone intrusion detection systems). The use and implementation of emerging technologies vary significantly across the United States. The variety of use and experience is attributed to challenges and barriers that DOT face to investigate, test, and implement a specific technology. The implementation of emerging technologies also depends on the support received from internal management, the state legislation, as well as the ability of the technology to solve a problem within the specific processes of a state DOT. As technologies continue to be introduced and improve, state DOTs continue to consider and explore various technologies for construction. The main objective of this thesis is to identify and document the state of practice, typical benefits and challenges, and trends in the use of select emerging technologies for highway construction delivery. This thesis utilized survey questionnaire, interviews and case study as research tools to fulfill the objective of the research. This five technology areas are: 1) visualization and modeling; 2) interconnected technologies; 3) safety technologies; 4) instrumentation and sensors; and 5) unmanned aircraft systems. Visualization and modeling technologies include building information modeling, virtual and augmented reality, light detection and ranging (LiDAR), and 3D printing. Interconnected technologies for construction vehicles, equipment, and tools are used for delivery and haul vehicles, pavement and earthwork equipment, and handheld tools. The results show that each DOT uses a definitive approach from initiation to implementation of technology. Some technologies like visualization and modelling have matured more than others and hence are exploited to full potential. The major challenges faced by DOTs in technology implementation are lack of availability of standard documents and the reluctance from senior management towards change. Case study results showed that general contractors are more active in implementing the technologies and reaping the benefits from these technologies, have in house staff that is experienced on its use, and exploit the possible outputs. The results of this study will provide practitioners and professionals with proactive measures and guidance on successfully implementing technology at agency (DOT) and project level.
dc.format.extent152 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectCivil engineering
dc.subjectEngineering
dc.subject
dc.titleEMERGING TECHNOLOGIES & THEIR ADOPTION ACROSS US DOT'S: A PURSUIT TO OPTIMIZE PERFORMANCE IN HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT DELIVERY
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberLines, Brian
dc.contributor.cmtememberPanethiere, Michael
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineCivil, Environmental & Architectural Engineering
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.S.
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-0728-0749
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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