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dc.contributor.advisorGoetz, Jeannine R
dc.contributor.authorPachta, Dayna Marie
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T04:02:01Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T04:02:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-31
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:15242
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/25884
dc.description.abstractBackground High-fiber diets are associated with weight management though data are lacking in pregnant women. Pregnant women consume half of the daily fiber recommendation (~15 grams/day) and 55% experience excessive gestational weight gain (GWG). Fiber from snacks in the general U.S. population is significant (≥20%) to total fiber intake (1). The purpose was to assess the relationships between snacking, energy, and fiber intake in participants from a 12-week RCT to study if a high fiber diet can prevent excessive GWG. Methods Women were block-randomized (2:1 ratio) into either the intervention (n=12) or usual care (n=8) group. The intervention group was advised to consume ≥30 grams of fiber/ day and met weekly in a group with a dietitian. High fiber snacks (10-12 grams/day) were given during the first 6 weeks of the study but were not provided from 6-12-weeks. Three 24-hour diet recalls were collected at 0-, 6-, and 12-weeks for nutrient analysis. Snacks were participant-identified during diet recalls. T-tests and a regression analysis were completed following an intent-to-treat analysis. Results From 0-6-weeks, the intervention group increased fiber intake overall and from snacks (+10.8 grams and +4.5 grams, respectively; p<0.05), while decreasing snack calories by 25.4 kcals (p=0.122). However, from 6-12-weeks a decrease in fiber intake overall and from snacks occurred in the intervention group (-5.9 grams vs -4.7 grams; p=0.122 and p<0.05, respectively). GWG in the intervention group was lower relative to the usual care group from baseline to 12-weeks with borderline significance (4.7 kg and 6.3 kg respectively; p=0.149). Percent energy intake from snacks was not a significant predictor of GWG (p=0.508). Conclusion Giving high-fiber snacks to pregnant women increased fiber intake without significantly increasing energy intake. Though total fiber in the intervention group decreased when snacks were not provided, total fiber intake was 4.9 grams greater than baseline. In conclusion, increasing fiber intake during pregnancy may help prevent excessive GWG.
dc.format.extent65 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.subjectfiber
dc.subjectgestational weight gain
dc.subjectpregnancy
dc.subjectsnacking
dc.titleSnacking During Pregnancy and its Relationship with Gestational Weight Gain
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberHull, Holly R
dc.contributor.cmtememberSullivan, Debra K
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineDietetics & Nutrition
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.S.
dc.identifier.orcid
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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