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dc.contributor.advisorSpooner, Steven C
dc.contributor.authorWilder, Rachel Lais
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-16T04:51:58Z
dc.date.available2017-11-16T04:51:58Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-31
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:15352
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/25399
dc.description.abstractPedagogues often advise that, when placing a student in competition, we should avoid the works of J. S. Bach, because everyone has different ideas of how it should be played. This hesitancy is carried over to the performance world, as those who claim to know Baroque style often criticize performers who do not adhere to their particular philosophies. Should such tentativeness exist? Could this be the result of differing interpretations of historical performance practice? We are fortunate to possess several early recordings of J.S. Bach’s keyboard works on piano which, stylistically, fit more comfortably within the Romantic period, yet are musically effective interpretations. These are filled with rubato, passages are covered in pedal, and they possess a wide dynamic range. The variety between these recordings, or even between the various movements within the same performance, is also striking. These exist in disparity to most contemporary recordings, however-- the difference loudly begging the question: what accounts for such a drastic change in the performance styles of J.S. Bach’s keyboard works? This study traces the development of the various early music performance movements throughout the 20th century, surveying the effects that they had on performances of J. S. Bach keyboard works as revealed through recordings. It also examines the validity behind some of the philosophies proposed: the question of instrumentation, style, and composer intent, examining these against early writings and performance treatises of the Baroque period. Lastly, it discusses the implications that the above has for both the performer and pedagogue.
dc.format.extent37 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subject
dc.titleLiberating Sound: A Study on the Consequence that Performance Practice Research has had on Performances of J. S. Bach’s Keyboard Works
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberMcBride Smith, Scott
dc.contributor.cmtememberSchwartz, Roberta
dc.contributor.cmtememberHaaheim, Bryan K
dc.contributor.cmtememberSuzeau, Patrick
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineMusic
dc.thesis.degreeLevelD.M.A.
dc.identifier.orcid
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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