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dc.contributor.authorSalter, Phia Shante
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Glenn E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-11T16:02:06Z
dc.date.available2017-09-11T16:02:06Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.citationSalter, P. S., & Adams, G. (2016). On the Intentionality of Cultural Products: Representations of Black History As Psychological Affordances. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 1166. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01166en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/24944
dc.description.abstractA cultural-psychological analysis emphasizes the intentionality of everyday worlds: the idea that material products not only bear psychological traces of culturally constituted beliefs and desires, but also subsequently afford and promote culturally consistent understandings and actions. We applied this conceptual framework of mutual constitution in a research project using quantitative and qualitative approaches to understand the dynamic resonance between sociocultural variance in Black History Month (BHM) representations and the reproduction of racial inequality in the U.S. In studies 1 and 2, we considered whether mainstream BHM artifacts reflect the preferences and understandings of White Americans (i.e., psychological constitution of cultural worlds). Consistent with the psychological constitution hypothesis, White American participants reported more positive affect, better recognition, and greater liking for BHM representations from the schools where White Americans were the majority than BHM representations from the schools where Black students and other students of color were the majority. Moreover, as an indication of the identity relevance of BHM representations, White identification was more positively associated with judgments of positive affect and preference in response to BHM representations from White schools than BHM representations from the schools where Black students were in the majority. In studies 3 and 4, we considered whether BHM representations from different settings differentially afford support or opposition to anti-racism policies (i.e., cultural constitution of psychological experience). In support of the cultural constitution hypothesis, BHM representations typical of schools where Black students were in the majority were more effective at promoting support for anti-racism policies compared to BHM representations typical of predominately White schools and a control condition. This effect was mediated by the effect of (different) BHM representations on perception of racism. Together, these studies suggest that representations of Black History constitute cultural affordances that, depending on their source, can promote (or impede) perception of racism and anti-racism efforts. This research contributes to an emerging body of work examining the bidirectional, psychological importance of cultural products. We discuss implications for theorizing collective manifestations of mind.en_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Salter and Adams. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectBlack History Monthen_US
dc.subjectCollective memoryen_US
dc.subjectIntentional worldsen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectRacial inequalityen_US
dc.titleOn the Intentionality of Cultural Products: Representations of Black History As Psychological Affordancesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorAdams, Glenn E.
kusw.kudepartmentPsychologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01166en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid5003080en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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Copyright © 2016 Salter and Adams. This is an open-access article distributed
under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use,
distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original
author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal
is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or
reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: Copyright © 2016 Salter and Adams. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.