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dc.contributor.authorLepping, Rebecca Jo Chambers
dc.contributor.authorAtchley, Ruth Ann
dc.contributor.authorChrysikou, Evangelia G.
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Laura E.
dc.contributor.authorClair, Alicia A.
dc.contributor.authorIngram, Rick E.
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, W. Kyle
dc.contributor.authorSavage, Cary R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-10T23:39:34Z
dc.date.available2017-09-10T23:39:34Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-10
dc.identifier.citationLepping, R. J., Atchley, R. A., Chrysikou, E., Martin, L. E., Clair, A. A., Ingram, R. E., … Savage, C. R. (2016). Neural Processing of Emotional Musical and Nonmusical Stimuli in Depression. PLoS ONE, 11(6), e0156859. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0156859en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/24935
dc.descriptionA grant from the One-University Open Access Fund at the University of Kansas was used to defray the author's publication fees in this Open Access journal. The Open Access Fund, administered by librarians from the KU, KU Law, and KUMC libraries, is made possible by contributions from the offices of KU Provost, KU Vice Chancellor for Research & Graduate Studies, and KUMC Vice Chancellor for Research. For more information about the Open Access Fund, please see http://library.kumc.edu/authors-fund.xml.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and striatum are part of the emotional neural circuitry implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). Music is often used for emotion regulation, and pleasurable music listening activates the dopaminergic system in the brain, including the ACC. The present study uses functional MRI (fMRI) and an emotional nonmusical and musical stimuli paradigm to examine how neural processing of emotionally provocative auditory stimuli is altered within the ACC and striatum in depression.

Method Nineteen MDD and 20 never-depressed (ND) control participants listened to standardized positive and negative emotional musical and nonmusical stimuli during fMRI scanning and gave subjective ratings of valence and arousal following scanning.

Results ND participants exhibited greater activation to positive versus negative stimuli in ventral ACC. When compared with ND participants, MDD participants showed a different pattern of activation in ACC. In the rostral part of the ACC, ND participants showed greater activation for positive information, while MDD participants showed greater activation to negative information. In dorsal ACC, the pattern of activation distinguished between the types of stimuli, with ND participants showing greater activation to music compared to nonmusical stimuli, while MDD participants showed greater activation to nonmusical stimuli, with the greatest response to negative nonmusical stimuli. No group differences were found in striatum.

Conclusions These results suggest that people with depression may process emotional auditory stimuli differently based on both the type of stimulation and the emotional content of that stimulation. This raises the possibility that music may be useful in retraining ACC function, potentially leading to more effective and targeted treatments.
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dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.rights© 2016 Lepping et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.titleNeural Processing of Emotional Musical and Nonmusical Stimuli in Depressionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorLepping, Rebecca J.
kusw.kuauthorAtchley, Ruth Ann
kusw.kuauthorChrysikou, Evangelia G.
kusw.kuauthorIngram, Rick E.
kusw.kuauthorMartin, Laura E.
kusw.kuauthorClair, Alicia A.
kusw.kuauthorSavage, Cary R.
kusw.kudepartmentHoglund Brain Imaging Centeren_US
kusw.kudepartmentPsychologyen_US
kusw.kudepartmentPreventive Medicineen_US
kusw.kudepartmentMusic Education and Music Therapyen_US
kusw.kudepartmentCenter for Health Behavior Neuroscienceen_US
kusw.kudepartmentPsychiatryen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0156859en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid4902194en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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© 2016 Lepping et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2016 Lepping et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.