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dc.contributor.authorWang, Zheng
dc.contributor.authorKwon, MinHyuk
dc.contributor.authorMohanty, Suman
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Lauren M.
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Stormi P.
dc.contributor.authorChristou, Evangelos A.
dc.contributor.authorMosconi, Matthew W.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T16:53:45Z
dc.date.available2017-06-07T16:53:45Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-25
dc.identifier.citationWang, Z., Kwon, M., Mohanty, S., Schmitt, L. M., White, S. P., Christou, E. A., & Mosconi, M. W. (2017). Increased Force Variability Is Associated with Altered Modulation of the Motorneuron Pool Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 18(4), 698. http://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18040698en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/24406
dc.description.abstractForce control deficits have been repeatedly documented in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They are associated with worse social and daily living skill impairments in patients suggesting that developing a more mechanistic understanding of the central and peripheral processes that cause them may help guide the development of treatments that improve multiple outcomes in ASD. The neuromuscular mechanisms underlying force control deficits are not yet understood. Seventeen individuals with ASD and 14 matched healthy controls completed an isometric index finger abduction test at 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) during recording of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle to determine the neuromuscular processes associated with sustained force variability. Central modulation of the motorneuron pool activation of the FDI muscle was evaluated at delta (0–4 Hz), alpha (4–10 Hz), beta (10–35 Hz) and gamma (35–60 Hz) frequency bands. ASD patients showed greater force variability than controls when attempting to maintain a constant force. Relative to controls, patients also showed increased central modulation of the motorneuron pool at beta and gamma bands. For controls, reduced force variability was associated with reduced delta frequency modulation of the motorneuron pool activity of the FDI muscle and increased modulation at beta and gamma bands. In contrast, delta, beta, and gamma frequency oscillations were not associated with force variability in ASD. These findings suggest that alterations of central mechanisms that control motorneuron pool firing may underlie the common and often impairing symptoms of ASD.en_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.rightsLicensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorder (ASD)en_US
dc.subjectIndex finger abductionen_US
dc.subjectForce variabilityen_US
dc.subjectMotorneuron poolen_US
dc.subjectFirst dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscleen_US
dc.subjectDecomposition-based electromyography (dEMG)en_US
dc.titleIncreased Force Variability Is Associated with Altered Modulation of the Motorneuron Pool Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorWang, Zheng
kusw.kuauthorKwon, MinHyuk
kusw.kuauthorSchmitt, Lauren M.
kusw.kuauthorMosconi, Matthew W.
kusw.kudepartmentLife Span Instituteen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijms18040698en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2265-0891
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmidPMC5412284en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).