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dc.contributor.authorRussell, Kristin L.
dc.contributor.authorKutchko, Katrina M.
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Stephen C.
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Nancy E. J.
dc.contributor.authorLevant, Beth
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-16T15:21:17Z
dc.date.available2017-05-16T15:21:17Z
dc.date.issued2011-08-15
dc.identifier.citationRussell, K. L., Kutchko, K. M., Fowler, S. C., Berman, N. E. J., & Levant, B. (2011). SENSORIMOTOR BEHAVIORAL TESTS FOR USE IN A JUVENILE RAT MODEL OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: ASSESSMENT OF SEX DIFFERENCES. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 199(2), 214–222. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2011.05.008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/24217
dc.description.abstractModeling juvenile traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rodents presents several unique challenges compared to adult TBI, one of which is selecting appropriate sensorimotor behavioral tasks that enable the assessment of the extent of injury and recovery over time in developing animals. To address this challenge, we performed a comparison of common sensorimotor tests in Long-Evans rats of various sizes and developmental stages (postnatal days 16–45, 35–190 g). Tests were compared and selected for their developmental appropriateness, scalability for growth, pre-training requirements, and throughput capability. Sex differences in response to TBI were also assessed. Grid walk, automated gait analysis, rotarod, beam walk, spontaneous forelimb elevation test, and measurement of motor activity using the force-plate actometer were evaluated. Grid walk, gait analysis, and rotarod failed to meet one or more of the evaluation criteria. Beam walk, spontaneous forelimb elevation test, and measurement of motor activity using the force-plate actometer satisfied all criteria and were capable of detecting motor abnormalities in rats subjected to controlled cortical impact on postnatal day 17. No sex differences were detected in the acute effects of TBI or functional recovery during the 28 days after injury using these tests. This demonstrates the utility of these tests for the evaluation of sensorimotor function in studies using rat models of pediatric TBI, and suggest that pre-pubertal males and females respond similarly to TBI with respect to sensorimotor outcomes.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectTraumatic brain injuryen_US
dc.subjectJuvenileen_US
dc.subjectForelimben_US
dc.subjectHindlimben_US
dc.subjectActometeren_US
dc.subjectBeam walken_US
dc.subjectControlled cortical impacten_US
dc.subjectSensorimotoren_US
dc.titleSensorimotor Behavioral Tests for Use in a Juvenile Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment of Sex Differencesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorFowler, Stephen C.
kusw.kudepartmentPharmacyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jneumeth.2011.05.008en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, author accepted manuscripten_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.identifier.pmidPMC3142868en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.