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dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Theodore A.
dc.contributor.advisorTucker, Sherrie J.
dc.contributor.authorSerj, Battsetseg
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-07T20:22:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-07T20:22:39Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-31
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:13557
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/23954
dc.description.abstractThis study traces origins, operation, successes and failures of the People-to-People program featured during the second term of the Eisenhower presidency. The program was a product of and a reaction to the Cold War international conflicts that emanated from diametrically opposed ideologies of democracies and the communist world. U.S. claims to the superiority of democracy over communism were rooted in immediate post-war America's quest for world leadership. The People-to-People campaign was a government-backed popular movement, which spread in the 1950s and expanded into the 1960s. It was partially coordinated and partially funded by the United States Information Agency during its first few years, with the expectation that it would attract private as well as grassroots support once it was launched. This dissertation explores People-to-People's various programs and projects including the Sister-Cities and the University chapter as models for secular voluntary movements of ordinary citizens who were committed to improving mutual understanding between peoples from different cultures. The idealistic nature of people-to-people diplomacy, along with a wide variety of personal and social stakes associated with international travel and relations, made the People-to-People University program one of the most popular student organizations on college campuses in the 1960s. People-to-People's popularity and ideals at that time attracted young Americans and provided them with both the opportunity and the enthusiasm to interact with foreign peoples at the grassroots level. It also gave them a sense of belonging to a broader, constructive human network, which promoted an appreciation of diverse cultures and a way to contribute to building the "bonds of solidarity" among people of many nations during the contested period of the Cold War.
dc.format.extent213 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectAmerican studies
dc.subject
dc.titleBuilding Bridges Across Cultures: A Case Study of the People-to-People Campaign, 1956-1975
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberJahanbani, Sheyda
dc.contributor.cmtememberGreene, Megan
dc.contributor.cmtememberDonovan, Brian
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineAmerican Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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