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dc.contributor.authorLotte, Fabien
dc.contributor.authorBrumberg, Jonathan S.
dc.contributor.authorBrunner, Peter
dc.contributor.authorGunduz, Aysegul
dc.contributor.authorRitaccio, Anthony L.
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Cuntai
dc.contributor.authorSchalk, Gerwin
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-30T18:26:15Z
dc.date.available2016-11-30T18:26:15Z
dc.date.issued2015-02-24
dc.identifier.citationLotte, F., Brumberg, J. S., Brunner, P., Gunduz, A., Ritaccio, A. L., Guan, C., & Schalk, G. (2015). Electrocorticographic representations of segmental features in continuous speech. Front. Hum. Neurosci., 09. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2015.00097en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/22096
dc.description.abstractAcoustic speech output results from coordinated articulation of dozens of muscles, bones and cartilages of the vocal mechanism. While we commonly take the fluency and speed of our speech productions for granted, the neural mechanisms facilitating the requisite muscular control are not completely understood. Previous neuroimaging and electrophysiology studies of speech sensorimotor control has typically concentrated on speech sounds (i.e., phonemes, syllables and words) in isolation; sentence-length investigations have largely been used to inform coincident linguistic processing. In this study, we examined the neural representations of segmental features (place and manner of articulation, and voicing status) in the context of fluent, continuous speech production. We used recordings from the cortical surface [electrocorticography (ECoG)] to simultaneously evaluate the spatial topography and temporal dynamics of the neural correlates of speech articulation that may mediate the generation of hypothesized gestural or articulatory scores. We found that the representation of place of articulation involved broad networks of brain regions during all phases of speech production: preparation, execution and monitoring. In contrast, manner of articulation and voicing status were dominated by auditory cortical responses after speech had been initiated. These results provide a new insight into the articulatory and auditory processes underlying speech production in terms of their motor requirements and acoustic correlates.en_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.rights© 2015 Lotte, Brumberg, Brunner, Gunduz, Ritaccio, Guan and Schalk. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectelectrocorticography (ECoG)en_US
dc.subjectspeech processingen_US
dc.subjectplace of articulationen_US
dc.subjectmanner of articulationen_US
dc.subjectvoicingen_US
dc.titleElectrocorticographic representations of segmental features in continuous speechen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
kusw.kuauthorBrumberg, Jonathan
kusw.kudepartmentSpeech-Language-Hearingen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2015.00097en_US
kusw.oaversionScholarly/refereed, publisher versionen_US
kusw.oapolicyThis item meets KU Open Access policy criteria.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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© 2015 Lotte, Brumberg, Brunner, Gunduz, Ritaccio, Guan and Schalk. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as: © 2015 Lotte, Brumberg, Brunner, Gunduz, Ritaccio, Guan and Schalk. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.