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dc.contributor.advisorHonea, Robyn A
dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Sara E
dc.contributor.authorPerea Camargo, Rodrigo Dennis
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-11T22:40:39Z
dc.date.available2016-10-11T22:40:39Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-31
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:13953
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/21671
dc.description.abstractThe brain is the most complex organ in the body. Currently, its complicated functionality has not been fully understood. However, in the last decades an exponential growth on research publications emerged thanks to the use of in-vivo brain imaging techniques. One of these techniques pioneered for medical use in the early 1970s was known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging based (now called magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). Nowadays, the advances of MRI technology not only allowed us to characterize volumetric changes in specific brain structures but now we could identify different patterns of activation (e.g. functional MRI) or changes in structural brain connectivity (e.g. diffusion MRI). One of the benefits of using these techniques is that we could investigate changes that occur in disease-specific cohorts such as in the case of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disease that affects mainly older populations. This disease has been known for over a century and even though great advances in technology and pharmacology have occurred, currently there is no cure for the disease. Hence, in this work I decided to investigate whether aerobic exercise, an emerging alternative method to pharmacological treatments, might provide neuroprotective effects to slow down the evident brain deterioration of AD using novel in-vivo diffusion imaging techniques. Previous reports in animal and human studies have supported these exercise-related neuro-protective mechanisms. Concurrently in AD participants, increased brain volumes have been positively associated with higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels, a direct marker of sustained physical activity and increased exercise. Thus, the goal of this work is to investigate further whether exercise influences the brain using structural connectivity analyses and novel diffusion imaging techniques that go beyond volumetric characterization. The approach I chose to present this work combined two important aspects of the investigation. First, I introduced important concepts based on the neuro-scientific work in relation to Alzheimer’s diseases, in-vivo imaging, and exercise physiology (Chapter 1). Secondly, I tried to describe in simple mathematics the physics of this novel diffusion imaging technique (Chapter 2) and supported a tract-specific diffusion imaging processing methodology (Chapter 3 and 4). Consequently, the later chapters combined both aspects of this investigation in a manuscript format (Chapter 5-8). Finally, I summarized my findings, include recommendations for similar studies, described future work, and stated a final conclusion of this work (Chapter 9).
dc.format.extent259 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.subjectaging
dc.subjectalzheimer's disease
dc.subjectbrain connectivity
dc.subjectdiffusion imaging
dc.subjectwhite matter
dc.titleThe impact of aerobic exercise on brain's white matter integrity in the Alzheimer's disease and the aging population
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberVidoni, Eric D
dc.contributor.cmtememberYang, Xinmai
dc.contributor.cmtememberBrooks, William M
dc.contributor.cmtememberBurns, Jeffrey M
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineBioengineering
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-0496-1445
dc.provenance04/05/2017: The ETD release form is attached to this record as a license file.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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