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dc.contributor.advisorSchrock, Steven D.
dc.contributor.authorBruner, Allison Marie
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-03T19:13:50Z
dc.date.available2016-06-03T19:13:50Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-31
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:14284
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/20933
dc.description.abstractIn 2012 in Kansas there were 368 traffic-related fatalities. The Kansas Department of Transportation is seeking to reduce this number by focusing on improving the traffic safety culture that surrounds and supports its roadway network. Changing a traffic safety culture, apart from just changing a hazardous traffic situation, involves impacting the beliefs, attitudes, and values of road users. To accomplish this task, research was completed in two parts: a survey of other states with regard to their respective traffic safety cultures and an analysis of recent crash data in Kansas. The survey of State Transportation Safety Engineers, which was completed by 27 states and was conducted through phone interviews and email, revealed several important things for the State of Kansas. Questions covered topics from policies, to education, to public involvement and awareness. The survey showed many trends, not only about emerging issues but also about traffic safety legislation, statistics, and bureaucratic opportunities and challenges. States also shared what processes and information they use to build their traffic safety programs. Finally, this survey shed light on innovative traffic safety culture-related programs currently in use across the nation. This list of programs was also analyzed to determine each program’s applicability in Kansas. The second portion of this research involved analyzing Kansas crash data from 2010-2014. Data were analyzed for the state as a whole first to determine statewide averages and issues that affect all Kansans. Then the data were broken out into the seven districts of Kansas in order to get more specific localized information for each district. The same averages were determined for the districts as the whole state and district-specific issues were determined. Both the traffic safety culture survey and the crash analysis will have great utility for the State of Kansas. The phone survey resulted in a list of programs that have been rated for their applicability to and ease of implementation in Kansas. The crash analysis exposed many issues for the state and the individual districts that should be addressed in a traffic safety culture program. This research will serve as a guide for the State of Kansas to use as it builds its traffic safety culture program.
dc.format.extent113 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectCivil engineering
dc.subjectTransportation
dc.subject
dc.titleInitial Framework for Improving the Traffic Safety Culture in Kansas
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberMulinazzi, Thomas E.
dc.contributor.cmtememberFitzsimmons, Eric J.
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineCivil, Environmental & Architectural Engineering
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.S.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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