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dc.contributor.advisorColwell, Cynthia
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Noriko
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-03T05:26:24Z
dc.date.available2016-01-03T05:26:24Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-31
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:13115
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/19566
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a guitar-accompanied singing intervention on agitated behaviors associated with the transition from day to night, referred to as sundowning, in individuals with dementia. Eleven guardians signed the informed consent; however, two eligible participants declined to take part in the study. The data on one participant were used to train the research assistant regarding the data collection method; therefore, her information and data were excluded from this thesis. Out of the remaining 8 participants (N=8), four (n=4) of them received music therapy, and other four (n=4) listened to newspaper reading. The investigator provided both conditions. A single 10-min individual session was offered to each participant approximately between 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. The investigator provided a guitar-accompanied singing intervention to the music therapy treatment group. She read the inner sections of the Kansas City Star newspaper to the control group. All sessions were video recorded, and a 15-s time sampling method was used to collect data using rubrics derived from the Pittsburg Agitation Scale (PAS) for both groups. The results are discussed as a series of case studies due to the small sample size. All 4 participants in the music therapy condition completed the entire 10-min session whereas 2 out of 4 participants in the newspaper reading condition completed only part of the session due to increased agitation and a participant's decision. Motor agitation was most common, and aberrant vocalization was the next. No aggressiveness was observed during the sessions. This study was preliminary, and the results cannot be generalized; however, noteworthy observations were made. Recommendations for future research implementations are discussed. Keywords: music therapy, music, singing, agitation, dementia, sundowning
dc.format.extent95 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsCopyright held by the author.
dc.subjectAging
dc.subjectBehavioral sciences
dc.subjectMental health
dc.subjectAgitation
dc.subjectDementia
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subjectMusic Therapy
dc.subjectSinging
dc.subjectSundowning
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF GUITAR-ACCOMPANIED SINGING INTERVENTION ON SUNDOWNING IN ELDERLY PERSONS WITH DEMENTIA
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.cmtememberJohnson, Christopher
dc.contributor.cmtememberHedden, Debra
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineMusic Education & Music Therapy
dc.thesis.degreeLevelM.M.E.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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