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dc.contributor.advisorJelks, Randal M
dc.contributor.authorBoson, Crystal Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-05T16:15:00Z
dc.date.available2014-07-05T16:15:00Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-31
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/ku:13371
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/14527
dc.description.abstractUtilizing popular culture mediums and artifacts, this dissertation examines the ways in which the American imaginary plasticizes the faith of Hoodoo and continually strips it of its religious, historic, and cultural impacts. Rather than being acknowledged as a religion, Hoodoo is presented in cultural mediums as something inherently consumable, commercial, and capable of endless, identical reproductions. The artifacts produced around this plastic representation are contemporary reproductions of racist, colonial, and paternalistic historic narratives that have damaging effects both on the religion and Black bodies. The dissertation argues that larger American culture perpetually reproduces these representations to profit from covert racism and religious paternalism while simultaneously erasing its history of Black culture and American colonialism.
dc.format.extent237 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Kansas
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and unless otherwise specified the copyright of this thesis/dissertation is held by the author.
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectAmerican studies
dc.subjectGender studies
dc.subjectCritical race
dc.subjectHoodoo
dc.subjectPerformance theory
dc.subjectPop culture
dc.subjectQueer theory
dc.subjectVoodoo
dc.titleDigital Loa and Faith You Can Taste: Hoodoo in the American Imagination
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.cmtememberAnatol, Giselle
dc.contributor.cmtememberCanady, Darren
dc.contributor.cmtememberHamer, Jennifer
dc.contributor.cmtememberMack, Beverly
dc.contributor.cmtememberTucker, Sherrie
dc.thesis.degreeDisciplineAmerican Studies
dc.thesis.degreeLevelPh.D.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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