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dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-11T17:47:47Z
dc.date.available2014-06-11T17:47:47Z
dc.date.issued2011-02-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13996
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: Dogs. They're not just for dinner anymore. Over the years, many a Chinese diner has cooked and served dog and there's a story about an emperor from ancient times whose favorite meat was dog meat. And while dog is still occasionally found on the menu, it's not that common anymore. As China's economy has evolved, so has the status of dog from meal to bourgeois luxury to beloved, pampered pet. Here in Beijing there are 900,000 registered dogs. And east of the city, there is a dog spa with a dog-and-owner restaurant a show ring, an agility course, a doggy burial ground and chapel, a dog-and-owner motel and two swimming pools shaped like bones. There is even legislation in the works to repeal the 14 inches or under restriction on dog size in the city and to prohibit entirely dining on dog. It's beginning to sound a lot like...well, Japan.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0218
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/879338-0218-dogs-are-not-for-dinner
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectDogs
dc.subjectDinner
dc.subjectPets
dc.subjectBeijing
dc.subjectJapan
dc.titleDogs Are Not for Dinner
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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