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dc.contributor.authorHacker, Randi
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T18:37:21Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T18:37:21Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1808/13957
dc.descriptionThis is one of hundreds of 60-second radio spots created by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) for Kansas Public Radio (KPR). The purpose of this outreach program is to introduce the people of Kansas to the culture and current issues of East Asia.
dc.description.abstractBroadcast Transcript: Once upon a time, the Koreans wrote using Classical Chinese characters that they called hanja. Then, in 1443, King Sejong commissioned someone to invent a phonetic alphabet they could call their own. The result was hangul which has been called the crown jewel of alphabets it's that easy to learn. The symbols that represent the sounds are shaped into syllable blocks after the form of Chinese characters. The shape of the strokes that form the consonants are meant to look like the shape that the linguistic apparatus, i.e. tongue and lips, takes when forming these sounds. With 14 consonants and 10 vowels, it is said that a student of Korean can master the alphabet and be reading Korean in about two weeks. Reading, yes but understanding? Ahhh. That's a different story altogether! #ceas #hacker #NorthKorea #SouthKorea
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCenter for East Asian Studies, University of Kansas
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPostcards from Asia;0187
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://audioboo.fm/boos/875305-0187-hangul
dc.subjectKorea
dc.subjectHanja
dc.subjectKing Sejong
dc.subjectHangul
dc.subjectAlphabet
dc.titleHangul
dc.typeRecording, oral
kusw.oastatusna
kusw.oapolicyThis item does not meet KU Open Access policy criteria.
dc.rights.accessrightsopenAccess


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